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got wake?
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92 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
prologue:

let me start by saying to those of you who have not encountered me on other forums, as i am usually in the can-am sections, not polaris, i'm very blunt and straight forward. my usual forum name is got wake?, but due to name restrictions and others already taking variations of it, i could not use my usual name, so GWPtuning/got wake performance tuning will have to suffice. i don't have any alliances yet, so i say my opinion and post my test results as fairly as possible. i specialize in CVT tuning, but also do a bit of fuel tuning as well. i've done my share of wrenching on motors too, although i usually only turn wrenches on my own vehicles or for close friends. that being said, i was offered a great opportunity to install a procharger supercharger kit on a 900 XP. the following review will be as unbiased as possible for a few reasons. one is that it isn't my RZR. i'd be happy with one stock after the bit of riding i did before the SC arrived. another is i didn't buy the SC or any of the other parts needed to make it work. that being said, i'm not going to comment on whether or not the upgrade is worth the cost, since i didn't write the check for it. i will only be talking about the overall installation experience and my before and after performance opinion. i hope my review and observations of the installation will help others who purchase this kit. on to the start of the review.
 

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got wake?
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92 Posts
Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
delivery and inspection:

i can sum this up in one word: "wow". from first seeing the box to unpacking it to checking all the parts, this kit will make you say wow. the box was probably at least 5 feet long, although i did not measure it. the shipping tag said 85 lbs on it, which should be pretty accurate. i was not expecting such a large box, but after seeing all the kit components and how well they were packaged, the size made sense.

upon opening the coffin sized box i found a few layers of bunched up packing paper. beneath the paper were what seemed to be an endless amount of parts individually wrapped in the same packing paper. it's been hot here in florida, so i brought all the individual pieces into the living room to lay them out for inspection. every single piece was wrapped very well to prevent damage during shipping. they definitely did not skimp on packing materials, which is a problem a lot of places have. in the bottom of the box was a layer of convoluted foam padding, too. the supercharger itself had its own foam container, so to speak. with at least 3 to 4" of foam between it and anything else, the SC was well protected. i would give the packing a 10 out of 10 rating. i've bought a lot of stuff over the years, and this was by far the best packed shipment i've ever seen.

taking inventory and inspecting the parts was easy. once the packing paper was removed, all parts were in their own bags with very clear labels on them. they use thicker plastic bags, which also helps to prevent damaging of the parts during shipment. the labels have large part numbers that are easy to read, even from a reasonable distance. the clear bags allow visible part inspection without removal. there were two packing slips with the kit. one on the outside, and one with the installation manual. given the number of parts, i went down the packing list and crossed off the items to make sure everything was here. the last thing i want to do is start the install and be missing a part. nothing missing, so i put the parts back in the big box to await install.

the installation manual itself is a work of art. i've never seen so much attention to detail for a manual as what comes with the kit. anyone who has ever had to "figure it out" due to poor instructions, unclear pictures, or whatever else with a product will be happy to know that you do not have to worry about that with this kit. it is so well done that anyone with minimal mechanical experience could install this kit. quite literally my girlfriend was flipping through it and asked "i thought the work you do on ATV's is challenging? i could install this thing!". thanks procomp, now she thinks i've been making up how hard some things are to work on. the manual has pictures for everything. and i mean everything. every single bolt, clamp, whatever has a written description with a picture next to it that has a circle around what you need to work with. it doesn't get any simpler than that, except to have someone else do it. it tells you all the tools you need and has additional tips along the way to help you through the process. i brought the manual to work today and showed the quality control manager how detailed it was then said we need something like that for what we do.

so far everything about this kit has impressed me. and from what it looks like, it will continue to do so through the installation.

pulley side of charger:


blower side of charger:


top right is the new magneto cover:


intercooler:


pipes, plenum, new airbox:


more pipes. all formed and ready to go with minimal couplings:


team clutch kit:


required tuning components (except the autotune, as i have an LM-2):


two belts, four bottles of SC oil (only need one, rest are for maintenance), injectors, and paperwork:


dummy proofed manual:
 

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got wake?
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92 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
reserved for thoughts on installation


the install looked very straight forward from the install manual. i ran into a few somewhat difficult spots that seemed to be related to either changes from the 2011 to 2012 models on the vehicle side, or changes to the parts in the kit. i don't know what changes were made on the machine side, but some of the parts were clearly different than in the pictures.

that being said, procharger did a great job of building and packaging the kit as a whole. they even include a drill in the kit for drilling into the flywheel to lock the SC shaft from spinning:



the intake for the SC fit very tight. it also looks taller than the one in the manual:





the SC assembly bolted up:



make sure to tighten the belt with a torque wrench. if it is anything like the seadoo superchargers, you have to set it correctly so you get the desired boost level, but the system can slip. on the seadoo chargers they use spring washers between the drive gear and shaft to allow for slippage:


if you are like me and don't have a set of allen sockets, specifically 1/4", use a 6mm driver from a screw driver set along with a 6mm socket. the screw driver side is 1/4":



with the cover on, it still allows you to check the bolts and belt tension, as well as adjust it:



this is one area i would have liked to see the charger rotated counterclockwise a bit, or a short 45 coupling:


this is how it ended up. there is still plenty of meat from the straight coupling on both sides:



the surge valve is different than used in the manual. it is a noticeably larger unit from what i can tell. it still fits, but it is really tight:



in the manual they say to put the intake plenum on first, the install the 90 degree reducer. DO NOT DO THAT! you'll never get the reducer on that way. it is really tight on the plenum inlet. plus in the manual it shows a plenum with the inlet coming out of the side, not the bottom:



make sure all hose clamp tails and worm gears are not in contact with other hoses:





did i mention things are a tight fit?



i bolted up the new airbox so i could do preliminary tuning with the bed off:



make sure to secure the plastic anti-vibration mats where pipes may come in contact with them:





zip tie the brake light wires and plugs if you are going to do initial tuning with the bed off like i am planning:



everything secured, connected, and ready to go:


i know some won't like the IC location, but i installed it exactly as the kit comes. i'm kicking around some other ideas for mounting it:


it is much easier to work on things with the exhaust off:


all the piping is nicely formed and fits pretty good:


the three O2 sensors are hooked up and it is ready to tuning:




after going through the install, i will say it was not as easy as it looked from how the manual shows it. as previously stated, i am not sure if there were changes on the machine side, but there were definite changes on the kit side. it definitely took longer than i expected for the overall install, but when factoring in the PCV install time, including research and modification, and clutch kit install time, it wasn't too bad. the charger itself was the easy part to install. routing all the piping and making it fit took a bit of work. but if you've ever snorkeled a bike, you are already used to that and know out of the box piping never fits exactly like shown in any instructions. the kit is definitely not for a beginner to try to install without someone with more experience guiding you or nearby to lend you a hand. it takes some relatively basic knowledge and a good set of tools to install the kit. if you've wrenched on stuff before, it shouldn't be that difficult. if doing it by yourself, i would plan for a full day to do the install of just the procharger kit.
 

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got wake?
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92 Posts
Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
reserved for post installation tuning information



let me start by prefacing with my LM-2 did not like the RZR very much when it comes to the RPM and TPS signals. since i did not need to use the LM-2 to tune it, i removed it after i got a baseline for the O2 readings. the RPM signal from the injector wire would be stable and accurate at idle, then when i would give it gas, it shot up to maximum. after i let off the throttle it would settle back down to the correct RPM. i'm never seen it do that on any can-am or kawasaki. also the TPS signal would read half the voltage when compared to the PCV when hooked to the same wire, nor was the voltage stable. i could have most likely corrected that if i used the reference ground, but since it was not a necessity, i didn't take the additional time to hook up additional wires.

the positive note of hooking up the LM-2 was that i took individual readings from the head pipes to compare to the combined reading the autotune was getting. the head pipe readings were extremely close. i knew the inline twin motor would read closer than a V-twin, but i didn't think they would be within .2 points of each other through most all the readings. i'm used to seeing 1-2 points different, not one tenth of that. the twin throttle bodies with a large shared plenum and near equal length headers with near equal bends surely plays a big role in that. also, this being a boosted application, air is being forced into the motor, not sucked in, after about 4k rpm, so that should help equalize the fuel requirements for each cylinder. that being said, i see no reason to do a dual cylinder tune on one of these motors unless you are drag racing and want to get every last bit of performance out of it. for a trail rider, i don't think you'll ever see a difference with a single vs. dual tune.

this was my first time using an autotune from dynojet. i've used countless PC3's and PCV's, and only remapped the fuel after a PCV was poorly tuned with an autotune module. the problem areas i have always seen are the low throttle areas, generally 2, 5, 10, and 15%, with occasionally having issues up to 20%. those are the areas you are most likely to be riding in on the trails when cruising. heavy throttle is always easy to tune manually or with an autotune since the loads are more stable on the motor. after riding around my neighborhood for an hour just focusing on 2, 5, and 10%, i finally had the throttle response smoothed out pretty well. all in all i spent about 2.5 hours just on 2, 5, 10, 15, and 20% throttle, going up inclines and down declines so i could hit the range of RPM's for each throttle position. holding my laptop up high enough to see (it is a 10" dell mini laptop that i use for tuning since it is small and if i mess it up i won't cry over $200), i would hold the throttle at 2% for a bit, then vary between 1 and 3% for a bit. then i'd stop, then hold the throttle at 5% for a bit, then vary between 4 and 7%. i did that all the way through 20% in order to make sure the PC software got good readings on each throttle position and RPM's in their range. it was time consuming, but i think the reason why i've always seen poor quality low throttle tunes with the autotune is because people don't take the time to make sure each throttle position is tuned well.

to tune the higher throttle range i had my buddy holding my laptop so i could hold the wheel with both hands. at 40% throttle and 60+ mph it starts to get scary holding a laptop in one hand and the wheel in the other. i took another 2 hours tuning the higher RPM's, but could have probably done it quicker. i don't stop tuning until the adjustments being made each time are very minimal.

my verdict on the autotune is that i would highly recommend it. my only concern was that it always reads .5 richer than my LM-2. that did not cause any issues with how the motor ran. i even connected everything straight to the battery so i know they were receiving the same voltage. if it was only one of my LM-2 sensors, i'd just chalk it up to a sensor issue. but it was both. since they are different sensors running on two different systems, i decided to let the autotune do its thing without changing the target map A/F in the PCV software. i had no issues with it and surely no lack of power from possibly running a tad lean.

since the procharger kit comes with higher flow injectors, i would advise bumping up the trim adjustment in the autotune to 50% from 20%. this will let you dial it in quicker, especially in the areas where it has to remove a lot of fuel in the low throttle positions where there is no boost yet. after you've got a good base map, drop it down to 20%, or lower.
 

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got wake?
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92 Posts
Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
reserved for opinion of performance increase, trail manners, etc.


sorry this section has taken so long to get updated. i was hoping to get some comparisons of the throttle positions and rpm vs. speed with the belt on and off, but with the belt off it isn't even worth trying to compare to a stock 900. i knew the CVT being tuned for more power was going to bog it down, i just didn't realize it would be so much. plus the added air restriction from all the IC tubing as well as pulling through the supercharger all add up to the motor struggling to get air. that being said, running with the belt off should be used sparingly for if the belt breaks or if the charger locks up/has a problem, for whatever reason. it was also more of a pain to tune because the fuel change was outside what the autotune can achieve due to the lack of air flow and larger injectors. maybe someone with a stock 900XP with a PCV can post what speed they get up to a 40% throttle (that's the only one i remember from tuning with the belt on), which is just over 60 mph with a slight incline.

with that out of the way, i'll just have to give you guys my butt dyno estimates and opinions on how it feels.

the power increase is VERY noticeable. i installed the 8 lb kit, and i would say that given stock is about 62 rwhp, with the supercharger the power has got to be right around 100 rwhp. it definitely has to be over 90. the acceleration feeling is very comparable to when i did a lot of motor work to my old outlander, which was bumped up from around 43 rwhp stock to about 70 rwhp. i wish there was a track worth a darn around here so i could have gotten before and after 300' times.

forget about low gear. you'll be banging off the rev limiter too fast to make any use of low gear, except *maybe* with huge tires. it didn't matter if it was on pavement or dirt, low gear should only be used by more extreme mudders.

this thing builds up speed FAST! just tuning the fuel i was amazed at how quick even at lower throttle positions it would get up to high speeds with no effort. i remembered the 60 mph mark at 40% throttle because i was riding around my neighborhood tuning the low throttle positions and when i transitioned to 40%, i was looking at the laptop screen, then when the rpm's settled i looked at the dash and saw 60 mph. i definitely had to back off trying to tune 40% at that point. normally 40 and sometimes 60% isn't an issue to tune around my house, but not on this machine. i don't need my neighbors hating me, so i had to wait till i could bring it somewhere to open it up.

on the trails i was thinking that the charger may be too much, or at least too much for me driving someone elses machine. i don't mind driving crazy when i own it, but i am more careful when it is not mine. overall the charger does excellent on the trails. the lower throttle is easily controlled once you learn to control your foot, lol. and when you need more power, it is there instantly. it straight rips through the trails. going through some small whoops i was keeping up with some 450 sport quads that had the usual upgrades. they couldn't believe how fast the rzr was and how well the suspension absorbed the whoops. definitely bring your balls with you if you're going to do something like that, cause it gets a little scary. on the tight trails the rzr handled everything just fine. the engagement is a little higher than i like, but that comes down to personal preference.

if you are looking for a serious power increase without doing extensive modifications to your rzr, look no further. this rzr came to me completely stock. the only things i added were the supercharger, PCV to tune it, and a clutch kit. to put it back to stock, all the parts are there and the only thing you would have to replace is the small oil filler cover in the bed. while it is not a simple bolt on affair, it is still well worth the time for the gains produced. whether the cost is worth it is not for me to say.
 

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got wake?
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92 Posts
Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
reserved for tips/things i found to be useful during installation


if you don't have a tablet, i would suggest getting one. i have a laptop, but it's a pain compared to my toshiba thrive for keeping out in the garage and looking at the service manual:




this should go without saying, but some people might not realize it yet. clean the machine well before starting any work!

this is how it looked after taking it out and avoiding every mud hole:








it wasn't completely covered in mud like i normally get, but underneath the plastics was filthy:


after doing a good cleaning, remove the bed, panels, heat shields, etc:


once removed, you're going to find more dirt/sand/debris that needs to be cleaned off:


clean every nook and cranny to make sure you don't get crap where it doesn't belong during the install:




i can't say for sure, but the fine "dust" in the corners of the machined magneto cover look like it came from the compound used in a vibratory tumbler. the finish on the cover also looks like it was tumbled. the kind i used in my old company had slight abrasive qualities to it, so i cleaned the cover very well before installation:



with everything apart, it was a good time to check wires and connections. i found the jacket on the stator wire melted:



power tools are your friend, especially for removing the bed:



make sure to label all hardware you remove. i marked the bags by page number in the install manual. also, when removing the tail light plugs, twist out the bulb, then disconnect the plug. trying to get the plug out with the bulb in the socket was impossible for my fat fingers:




if you don't have a secondary compression tool, you can easily make one with some PVC and a long bolt, a nut, and washers:





cut a notch wide enough and tall enough to remove and install the snap ring:


i cut a slot on the backside to help guide the snap ring onto the shaft:




i'm sure many of you know this trick, but i figured i'd show it here as well. if you don't have a primary holder, a ratchet strap works very well:


just make sure to secure the other end to the frame:




the following will be added to a new post/how-to if there isn't one already. the 2011 PCV does not work with the 2012 crank sensor:






the PCV only needs two of the three wires for signal:



same with the stock ECU:



unwrapping the stock wiring harness:



the crank sensor is the only one in the wire cluster that has a thicker plastic jacket around the wires:



hmmmmm, the brown wire from the plug is connected to a bare wire. common sense would say that is the ground wire:





i cut off the split from the PCV wiring and tapped it into the stock harness. i used quick splices because i wasn't sure if the wiring configuration would be right:



the good news is the wiring is the same. left wire to left, middle to middle, and don't touch the ground. when i changed the timing at 0% throttle, i could hear the motor running differently.
 

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got wake?
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92 Posts
Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
reserved for any other topic i think up later.


items you are going to want to plan ahead for:

you're going to want a boost gauge. that will tell you if you have any leaks or if the system fails while you are out riding. i picked up an innovate motorsports mechanical gauge:



i removed the cig plug and moved it to allow room for the boost gauge. be VERY careful with a hole saw cutting the larger hole. the cig plug hole is where the pilot drill would normally drill through to hold it on center. i used the next size smaller hole saw and trimmed the plastic to size with a deburring tool. power is supplied by the cig plug and i tapped into the headlight switch for lighting the gauge. during the day with no lights on, the gauge has a silver background and dark numbers. with the low beams on, orange numbers. with the high beams on, white numbers.

route the air hose through this hole in the front wall:



zip tie the air hose the entire way back to the engine:



i used larger hose from the hardware store since the kit did not come with a long run of 1/8" ID hose. remove the plastic skids and zip tie the hose to the main electrical lines all the way back and up to the engine. it was actually quite easy to install the air line. just be mindful of anything sharp coming in contact with the line or anything that could rub a hole in it over time.


since this is not my rzr, i planned for easy installation and removal of the autotune module.

here i secured the plug with zip ties to keep it away from the exhaust pipe:



route the wires above the pipe like this:



this is what it looks like with the cover installed in the bed:



i used the notch that was already in the bed plastic so the wires don't get pinched too much:



here is where the autotune is installed, along with the PCV:



there is access to the USB port without pulling the PCV off. the red wire is the hot coming from the tail lights for the autotune. the small black and white wires are for the fuel map switch.

route the wires behind the ECU:



tuck the extra wires in this little cubby. i also installed the switch for the fuel maps there:



i happened to have some left over battery tender plugs, so i used them for quick installation of the autotune:



the autotune ground is connected to the battery terminal. the positive is fused. all wires are connected with marine connectors that have heat shrink and sealant in them:



the autotune can be installed in minutes for additional tuning now. i would highly advise installing a switch to be able to run a fuel map for without the supercharger running in case it ever fails or the belt breaks. if you don't, the motor will run pig rich until it is fixed. the wash down on the cylinder walls will generate a lot of heat and could mess up your motor. taking the additional time to install a switch and tune it will be worth it if the supercharger system ever has a problem.
 

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got wake?
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92 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
thanks guys. i've reviewed a few products before, both just for personal purposes as well as for manufacturer testimonials, in the ATV industry as well as others. since i didn't want to type it all out at the end because i might miss or forget about something, i'll be updating the thread as i go. i just finished doing a thorough cleaning of the rzr with the bed off, so once it's dry, it'll be back in the garage and the install will begin.

there will also be a review of the powercommander autotune along with the SC review. this is my first experience with one, so i'll be using it to first do a combined tune with my LM-2 taking readings of the individual head pipes so i will have quantifiable data showing how the autotune handles a combined tune and the effects it has on individual cylinder tuning. i don't think the rzr will be nearly as bad as the v-twin can-ams which can have a huge fuel difference from one cylinder to the other, but i still expect there will be a difference between them. once the combined tune is done, if i see a large enough difference between the cylinders, i will individually tune each cylinder and report the fuel demand differences between the combined tune and individual tunes. it will add time to the tuning, but i'm doing it mostly out of pure curiosity to see the difference on an inline motor with dual throttle bodies vs. a v-twin. on a v-twin, a dual tune makes a very noticeable difference. i really don't expect much of a difference on the polaris motor, but there's only one way to find out.
 

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:liebe069: :liebe069:
 

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got wake?
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92 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
well i had a couple set backs yesterday. it took my buddy a little longer than i expected to weld the O2 bungs on the head pipes. then the PCV didn't have the current crank position sensor plugs, so i spliced them in. once i know the right wires to connect to (i'm pretty sure they are right, though), i'll connect them in a more permanent fashion. and finally the manual states that a 1-1/8" deep well socket is needed, which i borrowed from a friend, since i rarely ever need deep well sockets that big, but the new crank bolt/adapter to drive the gear box is actually 1". just a few minor things that added up to things taking longer than i expected. but it is all coming along well. the install should be done today, and hopefully i'll have time to get a quick tune as well.

i would like to say a big FU to polaris for designing the CVT (calling it a PVT is just plain retarded) and shock locations so you have to unbolt the left shock to get the cover off the CVT. that is just plain stupid on the engineers part.
 

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Wow, didn't know that on the clutch house. Let's just say that I'm not gonna be finding reasons to go in there unless I need to change the belt. Bad Polaris...:rm_thumbdown:
 

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Wow, didn't know that on the clutch house. Let's just say that I'm not gonna be finding reasons to go in there unless I need to change the belt. Bad Polaris...:rm_thumbdown:
Yes my son had to change a belt on the trail 2 weeks ago,he got it on without removing the shock but it wasn't easy.:rm_thumbdown:
 

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got wake?
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92 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Wow, didn't know that on the clutch house. Let's just say that I'm not gonna be finding reasons to go in there unless I need to change the belt. Bad Polaris...:rm_thumbdown:

yeah, i'm going to have to tune the CVT on the street with the cover off. you know how i fine tune things, so putting the cover on and off is not an option. well it is, but it would make tuning the clutches a week long project! i'm going to see what i can put around it to make sure a pebble or other debris doesn't pop up and hit the clutches.

the service manual shows how to change the belt without removing the cover and notes that removing the wheel and shock is not necessary. it also says to mark the belt direction. i'm not sure why they didn't just put arrows on the belt, lol. instead of the magic bolt that can-am uses for belt changes, they include a tool with the tool kit that basically pries the secondary open. i'll take a bolt that holds it open any day over the polaris system. it makes me really miss can-am clutching, lol.
 

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got wake?
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92 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
I don't understand why you would remove the shock to get the CVT cover off? Mine comes right off without removing anything other then the screws that hold the cover itself on. 2011-XP

i rotated the cover every possible way i could and it would not come out. i may have been able to bend the cover enough, but it isn't my machine, so i'm not going to risk any unnecessary damage. i have noticed a few changes from 2011 to 2012, mainly in how the SC kit fits. it required a bit of finessing and cursing today to get the pipes and couplings installed.
 
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