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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Guys, been lurking on here for a while ever since I picked up my new 2020 xp 4 turbo S. Love it!

So I have 18 hours on it currently and I just took it for i guess you can call its first "hard ride", the first 15 or so hours was standard trail riding with the wife and kids so I kept it pretty mild. Took it to Coral pink sand dunes yesterday and the ambient temp was 95° at the hottest, machine is completely stock. Started off with our group and went for a long ride, again wasn't pushing the car crazy hard as we were trying to keep the group together. During these times car would get up to 210-220* and seem to take a while to cool down even with mild cruising. Coolest it would get is 200*. It overheated when i shut if off and tried to start it back up about 5 minutes later (i assume this is normal as i have read i should let the car cool a bit before shutting it off.

After this ride i decided i wanted to go get a GOOD quick rip in and see what this thing can do. Car was 200* when i left camp and about 3 mins in, if that the car was over 230* and detuning (check engine light and overheat symbol lit up). I let it cool back down to 200* and it happened again within about 30-40 seconds. At this point i decided to just head back to camp and call it for the day.

I have plenty of warranty and have no issues dropping it off at the dealer to have them deal with it, BUT if they are extremely backed up (high possibility) and its as simple as me possibly having air in my cooling system or my T-stat is bad i would rather do it myself so i can get back out on the trail. Any ideas?
 

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Might have an air pocket. Put the front end in the air to make the radiator highest spot, remove radiator cap, cycle coolant a cpl times. Another air pocket problem could be resolved by opening the bleeder on the cylinder head above the exhaust manifold, kinda hard to find it, obviously wait til its cooled off. Another problem could be blown head gasket.
 

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95 air temp then add very soft sand, add high HP being pushed hard. That is the recipe for hot engines. Watch Matt's Offroad Recovery YouTube vids. He runs in that country to recover broke toys. The sand is very hard on equipment to get through. He has to stop and splash water on radiator to cool down his Jeep that is set up for that country. No surprise you were running hot. Try it early morning when the air temp is better or at night and see the difference. Have seen engines and belt temps really climb with easy trail use in that country with high 90 temps. Really doubt anything is wrong with your machine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
95 air temp then add very soft sand, add high HP being pushed hard. That is the recipe for hot engines. Watch Matt's Offroad Recovery YouTube vids. He runs in that country to recover broke toys. The sand is very hard on equipment to get through. He has to stop and splash water on radiator to cool down his Jeep that is set up for that country. No surprise you were running hot. Try it early morning when the air temp is better or at night and see the difference. Have seen engines and belt temps really climb with easy trail use in that country with high 90 temps. Really doubt anything is wrong with your machine.
Id agree with you but the little amount of time that I pushed the car would mean everyone would have this problem. But multiple reasons have me believing i have an issue.
1. I've been riding my whole life and most recently had a YXZ prior to this rzr. Have had very similar days in coral pink in July with that car. And as you can imagine I was even harder on the throttle in the yxz because it doesn't have near the hp or torque my turbo s has. Never a heat issue with the yxz.
2. I was riding with my buddy who has a standard 2017 xp 4 turbo, he has bigger tires and a roll cage other wise he is stock. He had no issues with heat and his tempsnwere consistently much cooler.
 

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Is the overflow bottle full of coolant? Have seen the hose clamp on bottom of bottle leak. Just needed a little bit of relocation to stop the leak. You could be low on coolant.
 

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I saw that the Pro XP has a coolant line from the head to the coolant reservoir so air bubbles can escape. Newer dune buggies are being built with multiple coolant lines at key points on the engine for that purpose - so, yeah, it's a known problem.

 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I saw that the Pro XP has a coolant line from the head to the coolant reservoir so air bubbles can escape. Newer dune buggies are being built with multiple coolant lines at key points on the engine for that purpose - so, yeah, it's a known problem.

So we are leaning towards air in the system? Any particular way to easily tell if if fixed the issue? What should the car run at normally?
 

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I have no idea what the spec is and can only speak from experience of the roughly 400 miles on my 2020 S 4

On desert hard pack, runs around 190º+or- 205º on a long hard climb, saw 212 for a second but it would come down right way. It was about 70-80º that day. Tires at 16 psi and 1 passenger.
 

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Might consider a tune that will lower the fan on and off temperature. I saw 228 on a very long slow climb over rocks with 4 adults in the car and 90 degree ambient, it came down pretty fast but remained about 200 the rest of the day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Might consider a tune that will lower the fan on and off temperature. I saw 228 on a very long slow climb over rocks with 4 adults in the car and 90 degree ambient, it came down pretty fast but remained about 200 the rest of the day.
I'll start heading down the aftermarket route if there is nothing wrong. I'm hoping there is air in the system and I can just bleed it out for the easy fix.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I saw that the Pro XP has a coolant line from the head to the coolant reservoir so air bubbles can escape. Newer dune buggies are being built with multiple coolant lines at key points on the engine for that purpose - so, yeah, it's a known problem.

So this makes alot of sense. My rzr got to over 250° because I ran it hard then shut it off. Then tried to start it up 3-4 mins later. So it could have possibly boiled partially and created air in the system.
 

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So this makes alot of sense. My rzr got to over 250° because I ran it hard then shut it off. Then tried to start it up 3-4 mins later. So it could have possibly boiled partially and created air in the system.
The book says to let it idle for 30 seconds to let the turbo cool down - I go longer so the coolant can too - plus I can't see how 30 seconds is long enough.

657759
 

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Elevate the front as high as you can get it. Put the machine in neutral and reverse the engine a little while the car is warm enough for the thermostat to be open your air lock will be eliminated.
 

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If you still suspect an air pocket after putting the front up, crack the bleeder on the cylinder head while the machine is flat. You will hear some air escape.
 
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