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I’m sure you have seen the expensive ATV/SxS loaded onto a trailer that looks like it should be in the junk yard. A friend of mine is guilty of this... Do you keep your trailer tires at 50psi? Check them before every trip? A quick web search showed trailer tire life span at 3-8 years regardless of mileage. Really? How often you check/grease your hubs? Check signals and marker lights? Any trailer storage tips? The trailer is an important piece of equipment, there are folks out there that just bring it out of the yard, load and go and don’t give it much thought. Trailer issues can be a hell of thing on the road. Read posts on here that show how some strap their machines down for travel, some good advice there but was curious about your trailer maintenance program.
 

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The Lone Rzr
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2,268 Posts
Always maintain tire pressure and give a little grease after every trip.
Just replaced my tires after 5 years.
I also cover my tires.
It's not worth trying to get every extra year out of them especially here with the dry heat.
I see so many boat trailers with blown tires this time of year when people just get their boat out of storage and probably don't check them and start rolling down the hwy when it's 100*+ outside
 

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Most trailers have bearing buddies, easy to grease before each trip. Always check tire preasure and keep a spare and the tools to change it. I also rotate the tires once per season
 

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I haul 2 800s on a single axle trailer, it's a pretty heavy axle but still... Tires are of the utmost importance, especially on long trips. Proper pressure, and yes, don't try to get all the goody out of them or you will be along side of the road with a blown tire someday and it's NO FUN having semi's whiz by a few feet away. You will probably never wear out a set of trailer tires, 5 years like 185 said is probably a good number to go by. Have a spare, and don't let it get 20 years old either. I learned long ago that tires age poorly whether they are being used or not.

Last weekend in fact I pulled the hubs, inspected and repacked the bearings. Everything looked good and would have been fine for another season, but now I know for sure. Do that every year, and if you're in water like a boat trailer more often than that.

Check your brakes and adjust if needed. You should be able to squeeze the controller by itself and feel a good tug when the trailer brakes apply.

And of course lights need checked and repaired as needed.

That's my routine.
 

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The following opinion is from working at a trailer dealership for over 3 years performing repair and maintenance work. You should not put grease in your ez lube hubs before every trip. All you are going to do there is create to much pressure in your hub and blow the hub seal out of the back and spray grease all over the back side of your hub and wheel. Once the hub seal is blown out you start getting dirt and contaminates introduced into grease and prematurely wear out bearings. Ez lube hubs were originally designed for boat trailers to help keep water out of the bearings. The better thing to do is to remove the hubs and inspect the bearings every year to every other year. In my experience trailer tires very rarely need replaced due to low tread, they are usually develop cracking and dry rotting from sitting parked for long periods of time and UV exposure. Driving down the highway, a tire with low air pressure will generate more heat than an optimally filled tire and combined with dry rot will blow out fairly easily on a hot day.

Everytime I hook onto a trailer that does not get regularly used I check the lights, air pressure, and brakes if equipped (just test with brake controller on truck). My trailer that gets used almost every weekend in the summer gets a walk around everytime I hook it up for a visual inspection and gets a full check once a month. I try to visually inspect the wheel bearings once a year but it usually ends up being every other year haha.
 

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The following opinion is from working at a trailer dealership for over 3 years performing repair and maintenance work. You should not put grease in your ez lube hubs before every trip. All you are going to do there is create to much pressure in your hub and blow the hub seal out of the back and spray grease all over the back side of your hub and wheel. Once the hub seal is blown out you start getting dirt and contaminates introduced into grease and prematurely wear out bearings. Ez lube hubs were originally designed for boat trailers to help keep water out of the bearings. The better thing to do is to remove the hubs and inspect the bearings every year to every other year. In my experience trailer tires very rarely need replaced due to low tread, they are usually develop cracking and dry rotting from sitting parked for long periods of time and UV exposure. Driving down the highway, a tire with low air pressure will generate more heat than an optimally filled tire and combined with dry rot will blow out fairly easily on a hot day.

Everytime I hook onto a trailer that does not get regularly used I check the lights, air pressure, and brakes if equipped (just test with brake controller on truck). My trailer that gets used almost every weekend in the summer gets a walk around everytime I hook it up for a visual inspection and gets a full check once a month. I try to visually inspect the wheel bearings once a year but it usually ends up being every other year haha.

My previous 2 trailers (and current one) have had dexter ez lube hubs and consistently they fail a few trips after pumping the grease in to them to repack the bearings they blow out and spit grease all over the inside of the wheel. I am only going to pull hubs and repack them manually in the future and never use the grease fitting ever again.
 

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Its funny how many people put their $30-$40k machine on a ratty old trailer that hasn't been maintained. I cover my tires to prevent sun damage and pack my wheel bearings annually to ensure I have good coverage. I usually get about 4 years out of a set of tires. But air pressure and wiring gets examined.
 

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Tire pressure, marker/signal/brake lights get checked every time I hook it up. Grease the wheel bearings twice a season. Tires wear out from cracking/dry-rot before the tread is worn. I try to keep the tires placed on pavers instead of the dirt/grass. In off season, Ill put it up on jack stands to keep tire off ground altogether.
 

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I don't know if it's been mentioned yet,but....
In addition to a spare tire, carry a complete spare hub and bearing assembly.. I can't count how many times we've had people from out of town at the shop with bearing or hub troubles with no spare parts for their particular axle in town.

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk
 

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I do this.
1 cover the tires
2 grease the bearings and replace seals every year
3 do a full pre trip before every trip. Check all lights and tire pressure.
4 when stopped on a trip I always feel the hubs for any heat.
Almost 20,000 miles and 4 trailers never a flat tire or hub problem.
 
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