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Question on my 2014 RZR 1000 XP: After a complete rebuild I am trying to set the timing. I get the flywheel to TDC and align the intake and exhaust marks correctly as described in the manual. However, when I rotate the crank CCW to install the second cam gear bolts the timing chain becomes loose and skips teeth. I have tried with and without the chain tensioner and with and without the top chain guide. I also have tried filling the tensioner with oil to build pressure but it quickly loses pressure. With the tensioner and guide in place I can hold the chain on the gears but it appears to skip on the crank gear when rotated.

Has anyone experienced this and can possibly provide some solutions?

I have ordered a manual chain tensioner and a top cam chain guide for a newer RZR engine that wraps around the top of the gears.

Thanks in advance!

P.s. I have searched and searched for this answer and have come up short.
 

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The Lone Rzr
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You shouldn't be rotating anything to get cam gears bolted on
Both cams need to be set in place at the same time
If you're rotating anything then cam timing will be off
Do you have a plate holding the rear of the cams?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
You shouldn't be rotating anything to get cam gears bolted on
Both cams need to be set in place at the same time
If you're rotating anything then cam timing will be off
Once each cam gear is set in the correct position you are only able to install one bolt on each gear, you must then turn the crank to install the other two bolts.
 

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It's possible you have worn parts contributing to the chain jumping time, but most likely you already know the updated chain tensioner is going to be the fix. I'm sure you could apply enough pressure to the cam chain to keep it from skipping a tooth while turning to get the other cam gear bolts on, but having the ratchet type tensioner will stop it because it will put pressure on the cam chain and not allow it to back off when there is no oil pressure to make it push on the chain. As long as you have one bolt in and snug on each gear it should be fine to rotate for other bolts after the tensioner has been installed.

Few things to consider and some common things that are overlooked. I'm sure you have enough engine experience to know this, but it might help others.

Always take out spark plugs to keep engine compression from moving, kicking back or causing any undesired motion.

Always replace the cam chain, cam tensioner, all cam chain guides and gears when you get this far into a rebuild. Don't want to deal with it again any time soon.

Timing must be perfect and must be checked once everything is together and rotated a few times back to Top Dead Center or TDC.

You got this nearly done. Best to wait on the updated tensioner so you don't keep fighting it.
 

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Question on my 2014 RZR 1000 XP: After a complete rebuild I am trying to set the timing. I get the flywheel to TDC and align the intake and exhaust marks correctly as described in the manual. However, when I rotate the crank CCW to install the second cam gear bolts the timing chain becomes loose and skips teeth. I have tried with and without the chain tensioner and with and without the top chain guide. I also have tried filling the tensioner with oil to build pressure but it quickly loses pressure. With the tensioner and guide in place I can hold the chain on the gears but it appears to skip on the crank gear when rotated.

Has anyone experienced this and can possibly provide some solutions?

I have ordered a manual chain tensioner and a top cam chain guide for a newer RZR engine that wraps around the top of the gears.

Thanks in advance!

P.s. I have searched and searched for this answer and have come up short.
Did the automatic chain tensioner solve the problem? Or what was the fix?

I've got the same machine, and the same problem. 5,000 miles had a colds starting issue, and valves where tight. Machined them down, but when I went to put the cams back on....trouble started. And it seems as if the manual is missing a 'nugget' of information. I'm at my wits end, I've tried everything. I can get the I-I E-E all in alignment, but then when I rotate the clutch slowly, (as the manual recommends to make sure nothing jumps) with the chain tensioner in, it will jump a few teeth on the exhaust side and then I am back to fumbling around with taking a sprocket off. I do not like this mechanism at all. The exhaust is right in the way to sighting up the alignment, also it's very easy to trip a cam sprocket down into the crankshaft sprocket area .... or worse yet, drop one of those cam sprocket screws! Is there any sort of Technical Service Bulletins that Polaris sends out to the Dealership Shop Techs that might have addressed this very issue!??!
 

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When you install the Chain you use the Plate at the end of the Cams, Also you have to keep the The side Chain opposite the Tensioner tight all the time, if you let that get loose, when the Chain Tightens the Timing is Off. It can be tough but if you don't you will never get the Valve Timing right. I hope this makes enough sense to get it, not sure I understand it either. Good Luck!
 

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When you install the Chain you use the Plate at the end of the Cams, Also you have to keep the The side Chain opposite the Tensioner tight all the time, if you let that get loose, when the Chain Tightens the Timing is Off. It can be tough but if you don't you will never get the Valve Timing right. I hope this makes enough sense to get it, not sure I understand it either. Good Luck!

Just finished up today. Got it running like a top. I used the Weller Racing chain tensioner, about $140 delivered Ebay. That was the FIX for this issue for me. Worked like a Charm the first time I installed it. Seemed like it might be a 1/16 of an inch longer than the stock, the oil hole seemed smaller in the shiny side barrel. Other than that the fit and finish was exact like stock. But it had something that It needed and the chain tensioned right up. I couldn't put it in by hand like I could the stock one, so I know the spring pressure was much greater out of the bag where it was hard to feel just thumbing it down like a fighter jet missile launch joystick button. I needed a socket to tighten it on after about 1/2 way. I decided against the Alba racing one because it just seemed like it was more involved and tricky to get that thing installed and de-installed time and time again as I was fooling around with aligning the sprocket I-I,E-E marks. I envisioned myself losing that Micro SD Card- sized keeper (a mathematical certainty) and small screwdriver and it being worthless at that point. A stock tensioner might have done the trick as well, maybe the one I had just finally wore itself out at 5,500 miles / 5 years later. A stock one would have been half to one third of the cost. Certainly doable but I didn't want to flim-flam around with any more known mediocrity as this shade tree mechanic ninja project job already cost me more in time, money, and headache than anyone should have to endure. I was swearing my next Side By Side will be an all-electric Nikola rather than this model T rube Goldberg machine technology stuff. Lesson ends here: I took the bet on Weller, and Weller came through!

Enough Ranting, Here's my Procedure, Use at your own mental health risk:

-Set Engine at TDC for Piston 1, Clutch Side Piston
-Made sure all bolts on cam shaft holders and guides and chain guide were torqued to spec in the right order.
-Exhaust side sprocket wheel was free-wheeling, not attached to cam shaft with a bolt
-Aligned Both Crankshafts with a piece of 1/8" flat bar steel 2" wide and about 10" long.
(I had to put some tension on the Intake side crankshaft, rotating it backward toward the back end of the vehicle with a 22mm wrench --theres a hex area near the sprocket that you can grab on to).

-Made sure the Exhaust side chain was pulled as tight as it would go, first pulling straight up as close to the housing as possible. Then rotated the non-screwed sprocket counter clockwise (as I looked at it dead on from the muffler side) until the E-E were in line with the aluminum housing. Then put the screw in more than hand snugged, but not torqued. Everything was aligned at this point I-I, E-E.

-Put the chain tensioner in (after oiling it liberally) with hand as far as it would go, and got it snug with the socket, but not torqued.
-Took some Polaris oil and oiled the cams, tappets,chain.
-At this point I noticed the chain had was seated on both sprockets better than it had ever been and I gained much confidence it was going to work. Chain was tight, no sagging like a hammock in the middle of the sprockets.
-Pulled back the intake side cam sprocket with the 22 mm wrench slightly and freed the 1/8" plate spanning the cam sprockets.
-Started rotating the clutch Counter Clockwise ever so slowly with left hand stabilizing the clutch and my right on the socket. (Think like someone trying to break into a safe listening for that 'click') Rotated it about 90 degrees slowly so that I could get to the other bolt in the sprocket. I then torqued this bolt down on both Intake/Exhaust sprockets. Rotated it slowly until the other bolts showed up and torqued them down to spec. All 4 sprocket bolts torqued to spec. The final one on the exhaust side scared me because when I was torquing it the engine rolled past TDC and I thought It skipped tooth for a second.
-Rotated the engine through about 6 rotations, slow at first then faster and faster to make sure that TDC would roll past easily and chain wouldn't bind up or teeth would skip.
-No teeth were skipping so it was time to take tappet gauge readings, so I would rotate each lobe until the pointy side was facing upward perpendicular to the tappet and would take a reading.
.010 .011 .010 .010 for Exhaust side. This was the high side which I wanted when I had milled down the tappets on my drill press and harbor freight diamond sander bits. Used a Mitutoyo 293-180-30 Micrometer, Digimatic, 0-1", IP65.00005", W/SPC that I found on Amazon, amazing Micrometer. DO NOT USE Harbor Freight stuff, too inaccurate, not reproducible.
.0015 .0015 .0015 .0015 for the Intake Side. I was hoping to get a .004-.006! Instead I got almost a .002. This was a bit disheartening, because I milled them down by .006 each. I was hoping they too would end up on the high side, but surprisingly they ended up out out of tolerance by 0.0005 on the low side. Problem is they were so tight to begin with as I couldn't get any kind of feeler gauge under them., I didn't know how far down they needed to go.
-I decided to go for it and try and start it up.
  • Put back CPS Crank Position Sensor (Where you view TDC markings through a sight hole).
  • Torqued Down the Weller Racing Chain Tensioner to spec.
-I did a non-sparkplug crank on it first with the valve cover off just to make sure that things rotated fine before I did a detonation crank.
-Reconnected the fuel pump relay.
-Valve gasket and cover reinstall. I ended up cutting some slits in that aluminum firewall mat that Polaris half-baked installed on a Recall. It blocks that valve cover from being able to be taken off freely. Good god, they sure did that on the cheap and lazy. I don't know why they couldn't have come up with a better mechanism than that! Talk about a chicken-shizzle job. I was thinking about pulling the whole bed off so I could get to the engine easier, but as soon as I see the rollbars coming up through the plastic in the bed I realize I would have to take the roof off, shock reserves, ... freaking a 3+ hour job to lift the bed off and dismantle everything. VERY POORLY DESIGNED IMHO for maintenance!
-Spark Plug Re-Install.
-Key in Ignition, Let Fuel Pump Build Pressure, Started up the First Crank, no chain knock. It was 50 deg engine temp. Usually it would take me about 10 minutes to get the thing started with constant cranking until the engine temp would get to around 80 degrees. This was because the Intake valves were just too tight. Ran it 30 mph for the first 2 miles, then ran it about 60 mph for the next 2 miles, no problems made it back home. I'm ecstatic.

Good luck out there in your pursuits of DIY mechanics.






I looked at that Alba Racing one, and while I am sure it would work, it seems like it would have been a headache putting it in and out and I would probably lose that little holder key thing and then it would be worthless.
 
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