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So what are we looking at in the picture that tells us we need a catch can?
The disgusting oily/watery stuff draining out of the catch can....

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And why do you have water in your oil?[/QUOTE]



That's what I was thinking! I have a catch can on my wife's twin turbo car, and it comes out really black. That looks like it has water in it. Intercooler leaking? Or maybe snow country does that?
 

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So what are we looking at in the picture that tells us we need a catch can?
The disgusting oily/watery stuff draining out of the catch can....

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And why do you have water in your oil?
Not my picture. But every RZR that I have seen has a lot of moisture/condensation coming out of the crank case vent. The dry sump XP900s were notorious for creating a "milky" layer on top of the oil reservoir. Milky or not, even if what comes out of the catch can is mostly just oil residue, it's still bad especially for the turbo models as it coats the inside of the charge tubes and the intercooler and gums up.

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Discussion Starter #12
So what are we looking at in the picture that tells us we need a catch can?
The disgusting oily/watery stuff draining out of the catch can....

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And why do you have water in your oil?
Not my picture. But every RZR that I have seen has a lot of moisture/condensation coming out of the crank case vent. The dry sump XP900s were notorious for creating a "milky" layer on top of the oil reservoir. Milky or not, even if what comes out of the catch can is mostly just oil residue, it's still bad especially for the turbo models as it coats the inside of the charge tubes and the intercooler and gums up.

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I noticed it's less now that I run a good oil cooler.
 

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My last couple of turbo charged cars all ran oil catch cans. Most of the forums for turbo charged cars have tons of threads on this topic. I figured it would be a matter of time before they started up here. You can run a catch can on pretty much any type of car but it is even more important on turbo-ed cars. The amount of blow by when running a turbo is increased because of the added intake pressures. Like stated above the gases are vented from the crankcase normally through the PCV valve and routed back to the intake. In theory these gases are to be burnt in the combustion. What happens overtime is the intake valve starts to build up with carbon which cause the valves not to seat correctly. Also overtime the gas/oil/moisture (sludge) will build up in the inter-cooler and intake plumbing. This will cause the inter-cooler to become less effective at cooling the intake air.

There are two types of catch cans available. Vented and non-vented. The vented like picture by the op will filter the heavy liquids out and discharge any remaining air/fine gases through the vent. The non-filtered type will filter the heavy liquids out and discharge the air/fine gases back to the intake. There are pro's and con's of each. Catch cans tend to be more effective when mounted lower on the machine (Below the PCV valve)

There are tons of different catch cans available. I would avoid some of the ebay junk. Some cans have integrated filters and others require the use of filter media. Normally filter media is like a very course stainless scrub pad. (Don't use steel wool) The filter media will help stop the airborne particles and force them to fall in the can. The link above for the radium can is one of the best cans in my opinion available. It comes at a price. Mishimoto and Addw1 are a couple others that pop in my head.

And finally......Cold climates can also play a factor in the amount of blow by gases that are exhausted by the crankcase. Living in Wisconsin we have warm summers and cold winters. During the summer I would empty the can once per month and maybe empty 2 or 3 ounces from the can. During the winter I would have to empty the can once per week. It is amazing how much more moisture there is when it gets colder. There have been cases where these cans have froze solid and blocked the path of crankcase gases. If the crankcase gases get trapped the pressure will find another way to escape the crankcase. Its usually the crankshaft seal which is a costly repair. Moral of the story......Make sure you EMPTY the can OFTEN. It's hard to believe a mixture of gas/oil/water can freeze but it will.

Just my 2 cents from what I've learned over the years. Hell I haven't even looked at my new RZR to see how the PCV hoses are ran so don't yell at me if I stated something wrong.
 

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This is a topic for many forums and discussed many times. My supercharged fox is simply vented through the valve cover with a small breather, old school. I used a air compressor type on my Lightning. Since it was clear, you could see when to clean it out. One issue with it the filer media would clog up and needed to be cleaned with carburetor cleaner. Before doing this, I took off the inter cooler and spent many hours cleaning out all of the oil residue. I dumped it out every other fuel stop.

I haven't thought about the XPT. Surprised it isn't discussed more.


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I agree, a catch can is nice. However, you get a bit of a false idea of how bad the oil that gets pulled through the engine is when you look at what drains from a catch can. The catch can is open to atmosphere and will collect moisture via condensation. This happens to a lesser extend inside the engine, since it too is not air-tight. However, in the engine internal temps get high enough to steam-off water. That's not going to happen in a catch can, even with hot oil vapor going into it. So the stuff in the can gets much more milky and nasty than what the engine sees with the PCV still hooked up.

That said, I still like to run a can, and will probably end up adding them to our 2 boosted RZRs (Z1-swap and '18 Turbo).

-TJ
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I think the biggest problem is nthe oil collecting in the intercooler. Mine was dripping when I pulled it out. You can see oil was pooling up in the intake. Oil in the intake will lower your octane rating. Stock it's probably ok, but for the guys running a tune it could be a problem. I myself was at maximum effort for the stock turbo running 110 octane and advanced timing with bigger injectors. I wasn't happy to find to oil soaked intercooler. My new build will have more crankcase ventilation. I'm thinking about an exhaust evacuation kit. Short of a vacuum pump that's probably my best bet.
 

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My last couple of turbo charged cars all ran oil catch cans. Most of the forums for turbo charged cars have tons of threads on this topic. I figured it would be a matter of time before they started up here. You can run a catch can on pretty much any type of car but it is even more important on turbo-ed cars. The amount of blow by when running a turbo is increased because of the added intake pressures. Like stated above the gases are vented from the crankcase normally through the PCV valve and routed back to the intake. In theory these gases are to be burnt in the combustion. What happens overtime is the intake valve starts to build up with carbon which cause the valves not to seat correctly. Also overtime the gas/oil/moisture (sludge) will build up in the inter-cooler and intake plumbing. This will cause the inter-cooler to become less effective at cooling the intake air.



There are two types of catch cans available. Vented and non-vented. The vented like picture by the op will filter the heavy liquids out and discharge any remaining air/fine gases through the vent. The non-filtered type will filter the heavy liquids out and discharge the air/fine gases back to the intake. There are pro's and con's of each. Catch cans tend to be more effective when mounted lower on the machine (Below the PCV valve)



There are tons of different catch cans available. I would avoid some of the ebay junk. Some cans have integrated filters and others require the use of filter media. Normally filter media is like a very course stainless scrub pad. (Don't use steel wool) The filter media will help stop the airborne particles and force them to fall in the can. The link above for the radium can is one of the best cans in my opinion available. It comes at a price. Mishimoto and Addw1 are a couple others that pop in my head.



And finally......Cold climates can also play a factor in the amount of blow by gases that are exhausted by the crankcase. Living in Wisconsin we have warm summers and cold winters. During the summer I would empty the can once per month and maybe empty 2 or 3 ounces from the can. During the winter I would have to empty the can once per week. It is amazing how much more moisture there is when it gets colder. There have been cases where these cans have froze solid and blocked the path of crankcase gases. If the crankcase gases get trapped the pressure will find another way to escape the crankcase. Its usually the crankshaft seal which is a costly repair. Moral of the story......Make sure you EMPTY the can OFTEN. It's hard to believe a mixture of gas/oil/water can freeze but it will.



Just my 2 cents from what I've learned over the years. Hell I haven't even looked at my new RZR to see how the PCV hoses are ran so don't yell at me if I stated something wrong.


So I'm thinking a non vented with a baffle. I don't swamp my machine but I do have a lot of puddles in my area. This is kinda a new thing to me. I replaced my charge tube and it had quite a bit of oil in it.


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So I installed my catch can finally. Question to all, the fittings I had are made of polypropylene. Anyone know if this is good for this application? Also the can has 1/2" fittings. 3/4 to 1/2" Kind of bottle necks. 1/2" enough flow?


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