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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anyone tell me the grade of bolt Polaris uses on its skid? I replaced the stock and FUTV bolts today with SS bolts, but after thought it might have been more beneficial to use an ordinary grade 8 as the skid is a fairly high impact area. As an aside, the reason I replaced all was because two of them had lost their heads.

The factory bolts have S printed on the top; as I commonly look for grade based on dashes (and could not find what "S" means on Google), is it safe to assume these are your basic less than grade 5 bolts? Note that FUTV's also don't have dashes, so I'm not sure what they're supplying either.

Thanks all.
 

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SS bolts are typically soft blots. I would be worried about grade 8 bolts snapping off or tearing the threads out of the frame. sometimes you want a weak point. I would try the SS for a while. JMHO
 

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If you are referring to the factory skid plate ... they are self taping butter bolt! There is not enough material for the thread ... so unless you thread-sert it ... it doesnt matter what grade you put in there ... it only as strong as the two thread that in the frame!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
They're self-tapping, but they leave a 1/4-20 threaded hole. I completely forgot that the frame is so dang thin. But you're right--I suppose just about anything will work--or work as well as it can--with this frame.
 

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LOL ... yah .. thats what I was thinking.

I just thread-sert every hole with 1/4-20 serts the last time I took off the plate ... and I used 1/4-20 SS316 buttom head ... i figure there is enough of them ... and if it is coming off with a hit from something .... then I have bigger problems!!
 

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I have same problem....I think the bolts are very weak.
I have snapped 2 putting them in by hand and most of em are all peened over from rocks. I'm going to have to drill em out next time I go to take that plate off.
 

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I have snapped off most of my factory bolts on mine, just got some new skid plated Im going to put on, is drilleing out the old ones and re-tapping the holes the best way to go about getting the broken bolts out?
 

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no ..there isnt enough material to thread

I drilled all mine out and thread-sert them all with 1/4-20 thread-serts (thread rivet /riv nut) ... it would take an act of God to pull them off now!!


http://www.mcmaster.com/#nut-certs/=93u3yh

Knurled Rivet Nuts
Ideal for materials that are too thin to tap, these knurled nuts will expand when installed, providing extra strength and increased resistance against spin and pullout.
To install, first determine material thickness. Next, thread nut onto mandrel of an installation tool (see pages 3271-3272 for installation tools), place in drilled hole of material, and crimp to create a backside flange. A secure permanent fit between the top flange and the crimped bottom section (see illustration) is formed. Once in place, the internal threads are ready for a screw or bolt (sold separately).
18-8 stainless steel nuts have excellent corrosion resistance. Aluminum nuts are made of 5056 aluminum and are ideal for outdoor use. Zinc yellow chromate-plated steel nuts are made of C1008-C1010 steel and have good rust resistance. Inch sizes have Class 2B thread fit. Metric sizes have Class 6H thread fit.
 

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I have got to say, you guys on this forum totaly impress me. There is so much knowledge here. If anyone has a problem all they have to do is ask a question and you guys come to the rescue. Again I say, I am impressed. This knurled rivet nut solution is great. I put it, the web address, on my favorites, I know I will be looking for it soon. Thanks for the help.
 

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no ..there isnt enough material to thread

I drilled all mine out and thread-sert them all with 1/4-20 thread-serts (thread rivet /riv nut) ... it would take an act of God to pull them off now!!


McMaster-Carr

Knurled Rivet Nuts
Ideal for materials that are too thin to tap, these knurled nuts will expand when installed, providing extra strength and increased resistance against spin and pullout.
To install, first determine material thickness. Next, thread nut onto mandrel of an installation tool (see pages 3271-3272 for installation tools), place in drilled hole of material, and crimp to create a backside flange. A secure permanent fit between the top flange and the crimped bottom section (see illustration) is formed. Once in place, the internal threads are ready for a screw or bolt (sold separately).
18-8 stainless steel nuts have excellent corrosion resistance. Aluminum nuts are made of 5056 aluminum and are ideal for outdoor use. Zinc yellow chromate-plated steel nuts are made of C1008-C1010 steel and have good rust resistance. Inch sizes have Class 2B thread fit. Metric sizes have Class 6H thread fit.

How good are these? I've never seen these before, I've used time-serts or heli-coils many times. BUT these are frakin kewl. Do you happen to have a photo of them installed or installing them?

Thanks for the info!!!!!
 

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I dont have any pictures ... but they have been around forever ... they are as strong or stronger then the material you install them ... if that make sense!!
 

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no ..there isnt enough material to thread

I drilled all mine out and thread-sert them all with 1/4-20 thread-serts (thread rivet /riv nut) ... it would take an act of God to pull them off now!!


McMaster-Carr

Knurled Rivet Nuts
Ideal for materials that are too thin to tap, these knurled nuts will expand when installed, providing extra strength and increased resistance against spin and pullout.
To install, first determine material thickness. Next, thread nut onto mandrel of an installation tool (see pages 3271-3272 for installation tools), place in drilled hole of material, and crimp to create a backside flange. A secure permanent fit between the top flange and the crimped bottom section (see illustration) is formed. Once in place, the internal threads are ready for a screw or bolt (sold separately).
18-8 stainless steel nuts have excellent corrosion resistance. Aluminum nuts are made of 5056 aluminum and are ideal for outdoor use. Zinc yellow chromate-plated steel nuts are made of C1008-C1010 steel and have good rust resistance. Inch sizes have Class 2B thread fit. Metric sizes have Class 6H thread fit.

How good are these? I've never seen these before, I've used time-serts or heli-coils many times. BUT these are frakin kewl. Do you happen to have a photo of them installed or installing them?

Thanks for the info!!!!!
I don't have any photos, but can say they're very good. We've been using them for years to hold aircraft together, and they get the job done.
 

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I doubt you will get a response. This thread is over 4 years old and he has not logged on in over 1 1/2 years. Just look at his link to McMaster and see what size looks like it would work for what you want to do.
 

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Tad, curious...did you ever install them?
 
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