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Discussion Starter #1
To all those who post here, helping the next person by sharing knowledge is what it's all about. Big Thanks to you!

Someone out there needs your help and appreciates it. I know I do.

So, for the TRE owners out there. Here is your challenge.

WHAT IS THE #1 THING YOU CAN SHARE ABOUT A FIX OR ADVICE
SPECIFIC TO YOUR/OUR TRE?

Maybe you have a list, lets hear about it. Might be something new to some and old to others. Doesn't matter. Share something you think might help others or maybe something you want to ask about.
 

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#1 Start saving money for prop shaft improvements/repairs the day you buy it. About $100 a month set aside and by the second year of ownership you have enough to do it right.

About year 2 (~1000-2000 miles) is when you may start to have problems.
 

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#1 Thing to fix ( and lowest cost) - is get into your dark ( I mean dark lights off) shop/garage-and shine your shop light up under the dash and fill all those nasty gaps and anyplace you see the light shining through... You will be amazed on the light you can see between the fenders/ body panels and the hood !! Pipe foam insulation or pool noodles work great and cost way less than kits that don't cover what you want
It will be warmer on the cooler mornings-and above all reduce the amount of dust that is sucked in.. More places than what you would really think...

I agree with Rockymtn5280 on the prop shaft- as we both now run the RCV shafts.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Rockymtn, that was great advice. Drive line problems are expensive!! I have the Rhino shafts standing by, but not impressed with any of the hard mounted carrier bearings. I really like the Sandcraft units for shear strength and size, but my budget is strained to accomplish my weeks of exploration every year far from home. Will be waiting as long as I can before doing the swap, but welded caps on front shaft last year are still holding..... just a matter of time.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Another good one. Air leaks in cab are a big deal once you enclose the cab. I need to seal off a few more myself.
 

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900 miles on my 18 and just broke my first axle. It was the passenger rear and was a PIA to get out, until I bought a slide hammer. Third yank and it came right out. So for 72$ the slide hammer kit was well worth it.
 

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How do you break an axle? Jumping, spinning & then grabbing traction?
I just wanna know what to avoid to avoid breaking stuff. :)
 

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To avoid the slide hammer frustration- When greasing the bearings ( yes do it annually) I apply a thin coat of antisense to the axle splines on both ends of the axles
Never have had one give me fits over the years.. a slight tug and they come right out,,,-and takes no extra time to do this when doing your bearings... and you should be doing them...
 

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To avoid the slide hammer frustration- When greasing the bearings ( yes do it annually) I apply a thin coat of antisense to the axle splines on both ends of the axles
Never have had one give me fits over the years.. a slight tug and there come right out,,,-and takes no extra time to do this when doing your bearings... and you should be doing them...
yup, valuable lesson learned !
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I just thought of one thing that has helped me often on every rig to include equipment I have owned. Everyone should keep a maintenance log for every part replaced and what maintenance was performed and when. It has helped me to remember when fluid changes are due and also helped diagnose problems. If my rig ran great before last plug change or before I changed the air filter when I put it away for winter, that is a clue. That might lead to a easy fix by tracing steps back to the rag I left in the air box or the new spark plug that had a crack in the insulator causing a skip or miss in the spring time first run. Many good reasons to write it down... Add filter number, oil type, plug number and torque for common items like axle and lug nuts.
 

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Another good item-

Buy an OEM service manual. Yes, some torque specs are wrong but, it has valuable information.

Yea, its ~$90 but, for a $24K machine, that's pretty cheap.

Its also a good place to keep the data that Pro4 mentioned. I add notes & corrections to the service manual all the time and its where I keep my maintenance log. There is a scheduled maintenance section in the service manual where I keep track of mileage, hours, what was done, part numbers used, dates of purchase, etc.

The manual lives in a 2 gallon freezer bag and comes with me in the camper when I take the RZR. At home, it has a special place next to other vehicle service manuals.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Two things I realized I often overlook when packing.

A good tire pressure gauge that fits the beadlock wheel valve stem properly. Some wheels make the valve stem harder to check pressure than others.

If you run a windshield and or back window/enclosure, pack some microfiber towels to clean dust off and maintain good vision. Works for glasses and goggles. Hitting stuff that causes damage and down time is often avoided with clear vision. I keep a couple in door bag or dry box. Zip lock bag is a good idea as well.
 

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To go along with what Pro4 wrote about microfiber towels. . .

Sprayway glass cleaner. Best darn stuff out there. Most the time you see it in the big cans. They make a mini 4oz can that fits in a zip lock bag with some microfiber towels. Fits in the glove box or door bag.

4oz can link LINKY
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Good info!

Here are some ideas..

Plastic, Polly or Vinly Windows:
My Brother put me onto a product used on Aircraft windows called Plexus. If you have poly windows or soft top vinyl windows like I have in my CEC cab enclosure, this product works well. I have scratches from tree limbs and the Plexus helps me see through these parts of my side windows. Seems to fill in the scratches so they are not as noticeable. A microfiber cloth really makes this stuff work. After application dust doesn't stick to the windows as much and it washes off easier. Works on hard plastic windshields and back window as well. The large cans seem to last me 2-3 years of use because it goes a long way. You don't need much, so don't over do it.

Soft top/Tire care:
For any soft top material 303 is the ticket. Keeps material protected from UV rays and maintains color. It also keeps tires from dry rot or checking/cracks. I use it on my trailer tires that usually dry rot before the tread is worn out. Use it every 3 months seems to be the ticket.

 

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Most broke axles i found it is in 4 WD, with wheels cranked all the way one side of the other, especially in reverse when trying to get unstuck. i always shift to 2 WD if I have to turn around in a tight spot.
 

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Carry tire plugs and a small portable compressor also. 9 times out of 10 you will not need to carry a spare. We have put 8 plugs in a 2 in. sidewall rip and finished the ride.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Suspension Know HOW!!
Learn how to use every adjustment provided before you spend any money on shock springs or rebuilds. Spring sag is going to happen. You will need to adjust those spring collars over time to maintain ride height.

However, Nitrogen charge level is overlooked by most UTV owners. We don't own or want to deal with purchase of MUST HAVE EQUIPMENT REQUIRED to do it SAFELY! Very few people have a 3000PSI bottle of nitrogen in the shop with gauges, hoses and such to do their own suspension work. They farm it out at time of shock rebuild.

Find a club member or local shop that does suspension work. They can safely check the 160-300PSI nitrogen charge level often found in gas charged shocks. You can't check it with just any tire pressure gauge :) Please don't even try!

Lucky for me, my Brother had this equipment to service his race shocks on hand. My pressure was low and not equal left to right or front to rear. Find the setting for your shocks and test pressure in that range. Not only does it make shock seals seal properly, it plays a big roll in ride height and suspension feel.

My springs sagged after a few months of riding and felt rougher to me. The nitrogen charge and spring preload put my rig right back in the sweet spot of smooth riding and the correct ride height without buying anything.

Don't forget about this critical suspension adjustment. You are missing out if you ignore it.
 
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