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Discussion Starter #1
I know the factory springs are &hit but will have to do for now until I can get cash together for a ST setup. Ever since I got this I bottom out on things I don't think I should so today I cranked up my springs 2clicks and when I did this I measured the preload. According to the manual I think I'm about an inch off on all 4. I don't have the tool to turn the adjustment collar.
1) can I use a different tool (pipe wrench?)
2) if I move the collar down an inch will I gain an inch in ground clearance?
 

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I use a regular old punch to turn my collars... There are holes in the collar and you can insert anything that fits into it and start turning.. of course with the machine off the ground
 

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Set the preload to achieve the correct ride height for your machine. That's when you'll be sitting at the correct position in the shock stroke to have it working correctly. A Pro XP4 should have about 14.5" ground clearance on the front and 14" on the rear.

Before you start adjusting anything you want to clean off the threads as much as possible to avoid galling. I always spray some WD-40 or penetrating oil on the threads to help everything turn easier as well. The machine has to be jacked up with all load off the suspension. Turn the preload collars down until you achieve the desired ride height. To check it, you need to drive the machine back and forth about 20ft to let the suspension settle before measuring again. On the front, the ratio is about 1:2 (1inch of adjustment on the preload collar equates to 2" of ride height difference). On the rear it's closer to 1:1. Based on where it's sitting now you should be able to get a rough idea of how much preload needs to be added to achieve the correct ride height.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Set the preload to achieve the correct ride height for your machine. That's when you'll be sitting at the correct position in the shock stroke to have it working correctly. A Pro XP4 should have about 14.5" ground clearance on the front and 14" on the rear.

Before you start adjusting anything you want to clean off the threads as much as possible to avoid galling. I always spray some WD-40 or penetrating oil on the threads to help everything turn easier as well. The machine has to be jacked up with all load off the suspension. Turn the preload collars down until you achieve the desired ride height. To check it, you need to drive the machine back and forth about 20ft to let the suspension settle before measuring again. On the front, the ratio is about 1:2 (1inch of adjustment on the preload collar equates to 2" of ride height difference). On the rear it's closer to 1:1. Based on where it's sitting now you should be able to get a rough idea of how much preload needs to be added to achieve the correct ride height.
Thanks for the info I'm sitting about 2" low but according to the service manual the front is off by an inch were it should be so that will fix that the rear is also off about an inch so I'll just go a little more and then see what I got. Thanks again
 

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Set the preload to achieve the correct ride height for your machine. That's when you'll be sitting at the correct position in the shock stroke to have it working correctly. A Pro XP4 should have about 14.5" ground clearance on the front and 14" on the rear.

Before you start adjusting anything you want to clean off the threads as much as possible to avoid galling. I always spray some WD-40 or penetrating oil on the threads to help everything turn easier as well. The machine has to be jacked up with all load off the suspension. Turn the preload collars down until you achieve the desired ride height. To check it, you need to drive the machine back and forth about 20ft to let the suspension settle before measuring again. On the front, the ratio is about 1:2 (1inch of adjustment on the preload collar equates to 2" of ride height difference). On the rear it's closer to 1:1. Based on where it's sitting now you should be able to get a rough idea of how much preload needs to be added to achieve the correct ride height.
Thank you for this guidance! i used this info and set mine back to factory...made a difference this weekend for sure!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Is it ok to turn the shock collar down to get the correct ride height even if it is more than the service manual spec is? And do you have to have the whole machine off the ground or can I do the front then the back?
 

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yes, no, yes

😎
Agreed! The adjustment collars are there for that purpose. Each persons vehicle and Weight loading is different due to your specific options (roof, bumper, winch, windshield, etc) for the front, (storage containers and what you put in them, rear bumper, roof, etc.) for the rear, and how many passengers, radios, interior storage, tools, speakers, subwoofer, etc. etc. etc that all contribute to both front and rear wheel weight leadings. All different for each vehicle. These rigs have “adjustable, coil over Shock/spring suspensions“ at each corner which allow for great adjustment to suit the individual setups within a great range of differences/options.

In fact, if we were to really want to best set our individual corner heights for optimum handling from left to right turns, we can ”corner balance” the vehicles by adjusting each corner height individually so as to equalize (or close to it) the LF+ RR weight and RF + LR weight. Race cars do that all the time. Here we most often focus on front height and rear height together adjusting each side of the front and rear equally without regard for “cross weighting”. On a race car where handling is even more critical, the very same car with the same driver and identical weight from one day to the next will likely Change Springs/Rates, front and/or rear for EACH different race track!

All this to say, everyone should realize that as Owners of a uniquely configured vehicle, options and weights (not to mention weight of passengers) we have the responsibility of adjusting our preload to achieve our desired ride heights and handling characteristics. These are not on road passenger vehicles that are most often totally NON Adjustable. Our vehicles are Very adjustable and have huge Percentages of weight differences for different User set ups. Even if you do go with Shock Therapy progressive spring set ups, they wil HAVE TO know what your specific vehicle options (I.e. weight!) will be AND predominant riding style/environment to select the specific spring rates (I.e. weight ratings) that best suit those specified conditions.

Oh, one important caveat I think is often over looked, especially with the “more is better” mindset...the higher your ride height and clearance, the easier it is for the vehicle to roll. So, BE CAUTIOUS when cranking up preload and ride height higher than what you are used to pre adjustment and/or you go over the std 14.5” of clearance. I’ve seen people set up a vehicle pre load and ride height for heavy weights such as 4 passengers, lots of storage and spare tires, etc. with ”optimum” ride height for a particular day and set up, then on another day with only one/two vs four passengers with less weight and cargo start out with a lighter and higher vehicle go out and “get surprised” by a tippier vehicle and roll potential. Once again variables are real and need to be kept in mind whether we are complaining about what amount of clearance we have on our standard shock collar and spring set ups vs. what options/weights we have changed from a bone stock vehicle (no roof, storage, spare tire, tools, radios, etc).
Good Luck All.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks guys
I'm sitting at 12" or so will no one in the car just looking to get to advertise height with accessories on it. Not higher, down the road I'll get ST
 

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On each of my Pro XP 4 Ultimates I adjusted the shocks either 4 or 6 full turns to get to a desirable ride height at that end based upon the equipment/ride set up. After I adjust (with that end up in the air) I use a label maker to print a decal like “Plus 4 Turns .25” and stick on the shock which reminds me I have already turned the collars four full turns which lowered the collar .25 inches on the shock body. On my 2 seater I had to turn the rears 10 turns equal the ride height of my 4 seaters. I had the recall on the rear tender springs for my 2 seater completed last week and it’s seems to be where I had it with the 10 positive turns With the original tender springs but now with additional adjustment still left. So we will see.
 

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Help! Rears were easy to access. What is the easiest way to get the collars down on the fronts? Hard to get anything in there to turn them. Suggestions? Advice? Thanks in advance.
 

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Yep, tight. I’m able to loosen the top ring by hitting with a dead blow hammer then slowly work the bottom ring down. If too difficult just remove the shocks, adjust then reinstall. I did that too when installing the Highlifter arms. Both ways with the wheels off.
 

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I compressed the springs and ran the collar down the distance I wanted. Release springs...fine tune and then tighten.
 
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