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Hey All

I've been looking through the web for tips and tricks for RZR rock crawling. Most of what I've found is focused on Jeeps. While the 2 have their similarities, I'm sure there is plenty of RZR-specific knowledge around here that can be useful for any level of crawler.

What can you guys share about past experience, things you've seen, or your own mess-ups or success stories that would be good knowledge to share?

Cheers
Z
 

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Don't get over confident. At the same time the rzr is way more capable and also more prone to tip overs if put in a bad line. Practice makes perfect.
 

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Wheelbase, Wheelbase. Strength and weakness. You are able to weave your way through better than a jeep. Best way to figure it out is by trial and error. You will get that over the limit feeling sometimes before your at the limit. Again practice.
 

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Invest in a good uhmv skid and some better springs and a winch
 

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look up videos on youtube of rock crawling and you will see do's and donts
 

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It's mostly a matter of throttle control. Knowing when to crawl a rock or gas it. Sometimes I see people overpower a rock and spin the wheels when the should have just crawled it slowly. Sometimes you have to bump over rock using the skids. Sometimes too much throttle going up a face sends you over backwards but more often it's when you don't make it up the face and you back up and hit the brakes hard at the bottom that sends you over. Same thing going down a face. Hit the brakes hard at the bottom and instant endo. I'm always in AWD going up or down and it pays off. Nothing is more satisfying than crawling a face, getting some rear wheel spin and then the AWD kicks in and you motor up it. Crawling is an art and not for the timid.
There's lots of video on YouTube with UTVs doing some good stuff in Utah.
 

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Picking the right line, then using smooth inputs on the steering wheel, brake and throttle. Work with the momentum. Know your limits and work up to harder things. Like any skill, it takes time to learn.

Generally keep your tires on the high spots. Not much progress when your tires are off the ground. Generally large throttle inputs are not your friend and won't get you much plus that's how you break your machine.

Know where your tires are. You would be surprised how many people have no clue where their off side tires are. Throw a plastic water bottle out in the yard. Learn to move it around with the sidewall bulge of your tire with out running over it.

Look up Jon Crowley on youtube taking rzr's through the Rubicon. Watch how he picks a line then uses smooth inputs. He is really good. He is on this forum but I can't remember his screen name.

There are three of us that usually go ride, three different machines. We will find an obstacle and start working it for lines and different approaches. It is amazing how different we all see things.

:ride:
 

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Start small and work your way up don't try to take on the biggest to start with your confidence will grow. You will be amazed at what these can do.
 

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Lots of good info above! I will repeat some and add my .02.

Learn how you CVT system works and become one with it. This takes the time and experience others have eluded to. Aftermarket clutch kits are great but stock clutching can be better than the wrong kit installed. Don't just buy a kit and slap it in. Talk to a ruputable clutching guru and explain how you ride, size size with etc. They can setup you up with something that works instead of something you will hate.
I agree big time on watching others, especially on Youtube. You can find virtually any popular technical trail section on video and it really helps in learning the lines and seeing how others do it right and also finding out what not to do.
Don't bite off more than you are ready for. Most hard sections always have a go around. Watch others and learn.
As mentioned, full skid plates! Momentum, slow and steady. Throttle control, once you are against a big rock or in a bind, back up a bit so you have some momentum when you hit the bad spot that just stopped you. Don't keep trying if you aren't making it. Do not be shy to pull cable, it will save you broken parts and money.
Walk new obstacles in advance and pick your line.
Have a spotter that knows how to spot guide you in unfamiliar places. Choose a spotter you trust and ignore any other fools you don't know!
Don't be drinking! I love to have a few as much as anyone but having a few before challenging trails tends to be very costly!
Again, as mentioned, don't spin your tires, especially excessively. Wheel spin has its place but you will learn where and when in time. As you break over a big rock or ledge get off the gas quick! The biggest axle breaker is not the spinning it is the sudden stop once traction is regained.
Have fun!
 

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The area you're trying to ride makes a big difference on the advice. Where i live, you can seldom crawl through rocks on a rzr. The light weight and cvt hinder it. You have to use momentum and your skid plates. If you try to crawl you're just going to see your front end get up on the rock and your back end spinning. Or, you'll smell a belt. Its all about throttle control. You have to be in and out of throttle at the right time to protect your cv joints, belt, differential, steering.
 

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The area you're trying to ride makes a big difference on the advice. Where i live, you can seldom crawl through rocks on a rzr. The light weight and cvt hinder it. You have to use momentum and your skid plates. If you try to crawl you're just going to see your front end get up on the rock and your back end spinning. Or, you'll smell a belt. Its all about throttle control. You have to be in and out of throttle at the right time to protect your cv joints, belt, differential, steering.
Good advice. I call that 'rock bouncing", lol.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Lots of good info above! I will repeat some and add my .02.

Learn how you CVT system works and become one with it.
Can you expand on this one? Do you mean to feel out how your clutch best engages for the terrain type, grade, etc.?

What are the positive and negative signs to watch out for?

Can you also expand a bit on "bumping"? Is that when you need to bump the bottom of the rzr against a rock to "slide past" the obstacle? If so, can you explain a bit on the technique here? I assume you want just enough speed to bump over - be careful not to hit too hard, etc.

I definitely plan to start small, have a spotter, and go with an experienced rider on more difficult trails.

I'm in the UT area, so I'm specifically talking about MOAB when I refer to rock crawling :)
 

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Lots of good info above! I will repeat some and add my .02.

Learn how you CVT system works and become one with it.
Can you expand on this one? Do you mean to feel out how your clutch best engages for the terrain type, grade, etc.? Pretty much. Watch some videos and read up on how the clutches engage the belt.

What are the positive and negative signs to watch out for? Changes in how your machine moves and learn how to know/feel when your belt slips and get off the gas when it does and start over. You don't want it to feel like you are power braking with the RPMS coming up and not moving, when it does that your are burning and slipping the belt. Once you get some belt burn you will be able to feel the egg shaping when you take off on flat ground, it will not be smooth anymore and will feel jumpy.

Can you also expand a bit on "bumping"? Is that when you need to bump the bottom of the rzr against a rock to "slide past" the obstacle? If so, can you explain a bit on the technique here? I assume you want just enough speed to bump over - be careful not to hit too hard, etc.Bumping as in bump the throttle just before you get to a big rock or climb. NOT after you are against it. It is the momentum thing. You want to stab the gas pedal and not ease into it like and car with an auto tranny. That quick little jab of the throttle makes the clutches grab the belt firmly while the tires and move instead of being against a rock and allowing the belt to slip more as the clutches try to engage because it is way harder to turn the tire then.

I definitely plan to start small, have a spotter, and go with an experienced rider on more difficult trails.

I'm in the UT area, so I'm specifically talking about MOAB when I refer to rock crawling :)
 

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Using a bit of momentum, throttle control and picking a line to keep moving uphill through the rocks.


Here's a different way. Look at the line and listen to the throttle.

 

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I am no expert but have been crawling in places like the Rubicon with my RZR...

I try and stay on top of all bigger rocks when picking my line. There will also be times like others have said when you will literally have one foot working the gas pedal and the other foot on the brake. They will tip over fairly easy so be mindful when tires get off the ground. Take your time. It's called rock crawling for a reason.. :rofl3:
 

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Lots of good info above! I will repeat some and add my .02.

Learn how you CVT system works and become one with it.
Can you expand on this one? Do you mean to feel out how your clutch best engages for the terrain type, grade, etc.?

What are the positive and negative signs to watch out for?

Can you also expand a bit on "bumping"? Is that when you need to bump the bottom of the rzr against a rock to "slide past" the obstacle? If so, can you explain a bit on the technique here? I assume you want just enough speed to bump over - be careful not to hit too hard, etc.

I definitely plan to start small, have a spotter, and go with an experienced rider on more difficult trails.

I'm in the UT area, so I'm specifically talking about MOAB when I refer to rock crawling :)
When I refer to bumping, it mean sometimes you cannot crawl an obstacle like a boulder or rock ledge, because your skid hits, so you have to gas it a little and using your skid, bump over the obstacle until your rear tires can grab and you drive over it. Takes some practice. Going down a rock ledge you often drag on the skid with your rear tires in the air until the tires hit and you drive down. Yur kinda helpless until the rears grab so it's a puckering experience at times, lol.
Moab has some good trails for the beginner to get the feet wet and learn little by little crawling techniques. Any trail rated 5 and under are good starters while the higher rated like Cliffhanger (8)and Moab Rim (8) needs an experienced driver to get over safely. I did both the latter in a somewhat modified 570 so that tells you it's the driver more than the machine..........mostly!
Oh, one more thing. Use low air pressure in the tires. I ran 7psi on stock wheels while some will go to 5psi with beadlocks.
 

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