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SATV billet case built with HD parts and TRE gears would be very expensive. I would want to assemble it with tight tolerances using shims and I don't know where you could buy them or if they are available?

If SATV can put that parts list together with a price I could live with for years of reliable service I would consider it to be the best option.

The two things I feel are the weak links in drive line components are the front diff and driveshafts. Axles are close 3rd, but solution exist for that.
I'd be willing to bet that within the next year, you'll see a new TRE/HL edition from Polaris with the same gearing in an RS-1 setup, so it may be an option at some point in the near future....but until then, the billet case with upgraded internals are the only way to do it really, if you have a donor diff, then it would be around $15-1700, which isn't relatively terrible, but if you don't, the gears and output hubs are what makes the price shoot up, since you'd be looking at basically buying a complete diff from Polaris to get them, around $1200. You can buy the gears and hubs individually...but the prices they have on them are almost the same as buying a complete new diff.
 

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Still matching up numbers. Haven't forgot about you. Just need to get everything confirmed so I can make sure its all correct on the website.
BTW...there are a bazillion diff model numbers, and the OEM allocation is completely random. Going though the international models now to see if its in there. I'm sure we have it. Its just an oddball.
Hey, checking to see if you might have figured this one out? Apparently I have the same 1333791 oddball in my 2017 XP4 1000 Highlifter that needs to be upgraded
 

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Hey, checking to see if you might have figured this one out? Apparently I have the same 1333791 oddball in my 2017 XP4 1000 Highlifter that needs to be upgraded
Unfortunately we still don't make a complete diff replacement for that HL 1333791 diff. It has that different gear ratio, and we don't make the ring gear for it at this time. Its coming, but I don't have any good timeline for when.

If you're just needing the case and the sprague, we do have that available. You can add OEM internals to our case.
 

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Unfortunately we still don't make a complete diff replacement for that HL 1333791 diff. It has that different gear ratio, and we don't make the ring gear for it at this time. Its coming, but I don't have any good timeline for when.

If you're just needing the case and the sprague, we do have that available. You can add OEM internals to our case.
Unfortunately it’s the ring gear that’s bad
 

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Ugh!! That sucks. Sorry dude. OEM is going to be your best bet. Check with Adrenaline Cycles, AZ Cycles, or Second Chance RZR parts. They may have a used one for cheap that will get you up and running until something better comes out.
 

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I have received info 2nd hand from Polaris engineer that the TRE & HL editions have a slightly over-driven front differential. This results in 4wd engaging when you flip the switch, not requiring the 1% slip in the rear wheels to engage; this is an outstanding feature for rock crawling. The result is when the switch is engaged, you are always in 4wd and the fluid in the front case builds heat. This is why the unsealed soft plugs at the axle outputs leak in the early builds. Not sure if/when that was fixed as mine is a 2017. I just don't use 4wd unless needed to keep the heat at a lower level. You are probably going to have to go stock to get the same gear set. Your rear seal failure was probably caused by fluid leakage at the axle outputs which caused low fluid and failure of the pinion bearing and rear seal. I had the same issue, but only took out the pinion bearing. Caught it early enough to keep the carnage at a minimum.
 

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Good info. That is why it locks up right away and great to have when you need it now. The out-drive hub leak should not be from pressure because diff does have a vent tube for expansion of fluid. I could see heat thinning the already thin fluid being a part of the problem. Those metal plugs used before the rubber sealed plugs came out are going to leak. Silicone is a great way to stop it and extend the diff life. When my diff was loosing fluid fast after seal was torn from the pinion bearing cage I used everything from 90wt to 5w30 as daily fill to finish out a few days of riding. Only used AWD to get over toughest sections of mountain passes for few hundred yards. Even with 90wt the diff locked good after 5 foot of rolling, but you could tell it took a little longer to engage. I know it ran low on fluid as it ran out about as fast as I poured it in. But it got me through my last few days miles from no where. I didn't see a lot of wear from low oil level daily, but catching it early is key. I did notice some minor galling of the two out-drive hubs that are connected by a thick metal sleeve. I polished them, but still a tight fit. Plastic shim behind ring gear did seem to have some wear and this likely caused some minor diff whine after repairs.

Couple of things to note from this. First, no matter what oil or fluid you put in the diff keeping it lubed and topped off is key. Ring gear plastic shim between it and the case will melt without oil. Good idea to keep some oil and tools to add fluid at camp if you have leaks. Using AWD only when needed will reduce wear and heat for sure.

Also, I think everyone one should consider adding molly to the diffs. My front diff is nearly noise free after using molly in the front diff fluid for a over a year now and over 1500 miles. With no wet clutches anything that helps prevent metal to metal contact is a good idea no matter what oil or fluid you use.

 

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You guys are not giving me a warm and fuzzy feeling with my new TRE!!! LOL

I've got about 75 hours on mine now. I usually stay in AWD on the technical trails because it reduces wear the amount of rear wheel spin and I don't have stop to engage AWD if it gets hung up. And, I got the impression that running in AWD was not an issue when I read in my Polaris owner's manual that stated "There is no limit to the length of time the vehicle may remain in AWD."

However on our last trip to the Ozarks in AR, and on the last day, a friend said he could smell burnt oil coming off my RZR. I couldn't find anything wrong or smell burnt oil on the trail. However, and this could be unrelated to this thread, I could feel an intermittent vibration that came and went as if on a cadence. I stopped and put the RZR in 2wd to see if that made any difference. And, the vibration stopped until I put it in AWD again later.

When I got home, I combed over everything. I checked the fluids . The front diff took about an ounce to top it off and the rear took about two ounces. Neither plug smelled like burnt oil (it's an old school thing). The engine oil was good and looked like new. The front and middle prop shafts had been greased twice and felt tight.

I have no idea why or even if there's an issue. The AWD engages fine. Not much more I can check for. Vibration aside, I figure I'll just run it until something gives. I get a sense of tranquility knowing that I can upgrade anything I break. However, now I just hope it's not the front differential! LOL
 

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You guys are not giving me a warm and fuzzy feeling with my new TRE!!! LOL
I'll start with the obvious.. Have you serviced the diffs? With so little fluid in the front diff there is no reason to not change it often. I would for sure change it more if I had it under a load in AWD most of the time. Slight over fill wont hurt it. Being low will!! Need to overfill rear diff to avoid top bearing in the trans from failing. Cheap insurance and there is a thread on that.

Now think about this. Anything you use causes it to wear more than not using it. If you only used your front brakes the rear brake pads would stay like new for years! When you put the driveline and front diff under stress as in AWD, it will increase wear on those parts. I get it that using AWD will reduce wheel spin and help the rear tires last longer. It also might reduce some stress on the rear gearbox and such. However, we know the TRE prop shafts/driveshafts are not heavy duty. All the XP rigs have these problem spots. The center carrier bearing is also not so great. Using AWD often will shorten their lifespan. Service it often and check the magnetic drain plugs for metal. Some is normal, but any chunks on the magnet indicate failure is imminent.

When the center carrier bearing starts to go it stops rotating due to mud and water or just bearing failure. The entire bearing starts to spin inside the rubber pillow of the housing and this will melt that rubber until failure. Best to replace the bearing before this happens. I replace and or repack mine with grease every year, which is over 1500 miles of Colorado trails. The rubber is great at reducing vibration and there are threads on this as well.

Lastly, those tiny front u-joints are not going to last as long in AWD and you can't replace them with quality units due to the odd size. Can't grease them either. We have a few problems on the TRE. It's a great rig, but like all things mechanical, they have issues and wear out. Use AWD all you want, just know there will eventually be a price to pay for wear and tare on these parts. With good tires and slight momentum I rarely find need for AWD until those 100 yard steep climbs pop up. Even then 2wd will climb just about anything.

Enjoy your rig, just do as much preventative maintenance as you can.
 

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Pro, I have followed your posts for awhile and have learned To trust your comments as well thought out and good knowledge. My 2017 Tre, 2017 just developed the famous front diff. leak. Recommendation, change seals or further into diff. I believe I spending $ for preventative. I like high speed and rock crawling, raced AZOP last years in AWD.
 

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Pro, I have followed your posts for awhile and have learned To trust your comments as well thought out and good knowledge. My 2017 Tre, 2017 just developed the famous front diff. leak. Recommendation, change seals or further into diff. I believe I spending $ for preventative. I like high speed and rock crawling, raced AZOP last years in AWD.
This is what I plan on putting in mine this summer. Reviews on this setup are all pretty good from what I’ve seen.

 

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My 2017 Tre, 2017 just developed the famous front diff. leak.
Thanks for the kind words. Sharing info is great for everyone. I never stop learning myself.

Unless you purchased your 2017 new and know it's history, I suggest you take it apart and inspect the front diff parts. Need to know what you have and condition of the parts before throwing cash at it.

There are a lot of high dollar repairs or upgrades available and there is no limit to how much you can spend. Very expensive if you farm out the labor as well. Only you can decide if that is worth the money for what you are doing with your rig. Racing is hard on equipment because your going for it nearly all the time. That requires a high maintenance program to prevent and fix problems. If you have the budget, go for the high end parts and make your rig finish races no matter what the cost. If your like most RZR owners and need to control cost I suggest you do all your own repairs with the best tools you can afford. Inspect all parts before you spend money and only buy what you need to make it last a reasonable amount of time.

There are newer outdrive hubs available to address the plug leak that the original parts are known for. 99 percent of any leak at the axle is not the case seal you see behind the axle. It's the plug at the back of the outdrive hubs. Sandcraft updated bearing and seal kit takes care of nearly every leak issue the front diff can have except those plugs. They also have other parts ready if needed. Their labor cost to repair the diff is very reasonable. I do nearly 100% of all my repair work, but the guys at Sandcraft have the diff issues figured out. Consider sending the diff to them if you don't feel 100% sure of your abilities to do the diff work yourself.

The only shortcut Sandcraft does that I once questioned was the silicone trick for stopping the plugs in the outdrive hubs from leaking. However, it has been working for hundreds of people not ready to buy new hubs that cost $400 each. You can try it for cheap if diff is fine otherwise. Even do it in the car. Drain front diff, take the axles out, cleaning the inside hubs with parts cleaner. Put silicone in the bottom of the hubs. Put antisieze on axles and shove them back in before silicone dries so axles will fit. Then let it sit until silicone is dry. Refill diff and ride. Check for leaks and check the diff fluid often. Let you wallet be your guide on all repairs....

Worth time to read these if you have not done so...


 

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Great info Pro. I did not realize Sandcraft was in Phoenix and I am only 2 1/2 hrs. away so will call them Monday and probably run it up to them. I do not have the time and tools yet to tackle it, but will upgrade to all the sand raft upgrades. Not sure I will do the hubs as it only has 1700 miles. Was getting some vibrations in it so will probably have the driveline output shaft bearing replaced also. I did have the Super atv cv driveline put in last fall and just had the sandcraft bolts and shim put in a few weeks ago. While its out, have you had to replace your wheel bearings or front driveshafts? I found with my Ranger in Alaska the only time I snap them is full turn steering wheel, 4 we, mostly reverse will do it every time. Put steering stoppers in and solved that. Will,let you know what they found and how it turns out.
 

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have you had to replace your wheel bearings or front driveshafts?
Vibration seems to always come from a bad carrier bearing.

I think you are asking about the axles? I have not had any problems with front axles or front wheel bearings yet. Shot of grease yearly in all bearings is good. Rear bearings have been replaced due to axle failures at the threads and testing different bearings such as Tusk and All Balls against OEM which was best at the time. The OEM wheel bearings were redesigned a few times in the recent past so always get the newest part numbers from newest TRE rig unless they change that in 2022. My rear CV parts on Axles were still in good condition, but cost of replacing the outer Stubs is nearly same as buying completely new axles.

Consider these wheel bearings if budget allows....
 

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I am needing a new front differential for my 2018 RZR XP 1000 EPS Rock and Trail Edition. I would like to buy one from SuperATV, but they aren't showing one with my oem number which is 1333791. Has anyone purchased a complete front differential from SuperATV? If so, what oem part number did you order it for?
Hey Gibson just wondered if you ended up finding any other options then just ordering a new stock 1333791 garbage diff again?
 

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I have over 2000 miles on my front hubs since I cleaned, smacked the plugs with a socket & hammer and good sealant.

Zero leaks. Zero problems.

And, shim that front diff when it goes back in. Sandcraft front diff shim kit
tell me more on this smacking with hammer and socket and reseal trick..

I tried to put RTV in mine and it might have slowed the weeping down but I am over topping off the fluid all the time.
 

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tell me more on this smacking with hammer and socket and reseal trick..
In this thread-

 
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