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Discussion Starter #1
So here is the deal, wondering if I were to run an off size tire at slow speeds to limp back to the trailer would cause problems.

The situation is that I really dont want to invest in a 5th tire and wheel to match when I have two complete sets of wheels/tires.
For example if I am running 30-31" tires and bust a rim, could I throw one of the stock bighorn 29" (front wheel) on to limp back to trailer out without damaging any of the driveline?
I know the diameter isn't much different, and I would want to avoid anything high speed.

Looking for your opinions, as I am still a bit new to the RZR driveline, and dont want to damage it by doing something dumb.
 

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Yeah, as Joe said, keep the off size on the front and you’ll be ok, just might have to swap a good front to a bad rear and then spare the front if you had too.

I wouldn’t drive it with the AWD switch on in that configuration for very long either, especially not at speed.. be ok if you needed to get up or out of something for a short period still tho, might have some Ill effects in prolonged use tho.
 

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Shouldn't be an issue to get you back to the trailer. It will pull to one side if on the rear because of the reasons others have pointed out. The better the traction the worse it will be.

It won't damage anything.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks guys, that was kinda what I was thinking, that worst case keep equal on the back and then put spare on front and only run 2wd. I used to have to do that with my old truck that had a locker in the rear.
 

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So here is the deal, wondering if I were to run an off size tire at slow speeds to limp back to the trailer would cause problems.

The situation is that I really dont want to invest in a 5th tire and wheel to match when I have two complete sets of wheels/tires.
For example if I am running 30-31" tires and bust a rim, could I throw one of the stock bighorn 29" (front wheel) on to limp back to trailer out without damaging any of the driveline?
I know the diameter isn't much different, and I would want to avoid anything high speed.

Looking for your opinions, as I am still a bit new to the RZR driveline, and dont want to damage it by doing something dumb.
Let the air out of the other lol
 

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Why dosn't the American model have the option of the open rear diff (turf mode) ? that would help.
 

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Why dosn't the American model have the option of the open rear diff (turf mode) ? that would help.
No market it for it in a performance machine over here, and not required by any regulations regarding the MFG of sxs. The spool is a much better option for traction and durability.
 

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Exactly, you beat me to it. It definitely can break an axle or CV cup if ran on the rear on pavement.
I don't want to hijack the post, I hope the OP finds a solution.

RZR_Joe, do you think that running a slightly smaller tire would be more stress than turning on pavement with same size tires? I don't want to give someone bad advise, I'm hardly a professional mechanic.

I would have considered the drive-line to easily hold up to a ride back to the trailer even on pavement with different size tires, with zero damage to the drive-line. Is your experience that the CV's are that weak?
 

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If it were on dirt or a very short trip on pavement no issues. So you mentioned turning on pavement so you know the "hop" the inside tires makes on a short turn. Now magnify that times a 1000 going down a road. The larger tire will constantly be ratcheting back, biting / releasing. This shock loads the entire drivetrain. I would not say the CVs are "weak" but they are the "weakest" link. Chances are it wouldn't be an issue for a short period but not something I would consider doing unless 100% no other options available.

Personally I've never seen a tire we could not trail patch and we busted a lot of tires ovee the years. A better solution than carrying a small spare is to carry a tube. Takes up very little space and can be installed on the trail in a few minutes. I don't carry a spare because of the added weight and added center of gravity. However I do carry a tube.
 

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my tires are 30" and my spare is a stock 29". anytime ive needed to use the spare because of an issue on the rear i just swap a good front to the rear and put the spare on the front. dont use 4x4 unless your on very loose ground (mud for me) and youll be fine.
 

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What are you talking about ? Press the button and the the rear diff is locked, its the same machine, I dont know where you get this idea from about durability when all all read about on this forum is how these machines are suffering continual failures.
 

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What are you talking about ? Press the button and the the rear diff is locked, its the same machine, I dont know where you get this idea from about durability when all all read about on this forum is how these machines are suffering continual failures.
No, the rear contains a spool so it's locked 100% of the time. The US models do not have turf mode. While turf mode is fine for light duty yard use it's prone to failure on the Rangers when used in off-road situations. For every 1 failure there are 100 non failures you never hear about.
 

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What are you talking about ? Press the button and the the rear diff is locked, its the same machine, I dont know where you get this idea from about durability when all all read about on this forum is how these machines are suffering continual failures.
Never seen a post about the rear spool failing, but when you bring shift dogs and planetary gears into the mix at the final output, there is a much higher chance of failure, especially when you start bringing high loads and big HP into the mix. You also have much more slop and tolerance in planetary gears, which is easier to break under shock load and stress. The spool also has zero chance to slip, not true with a shift cog and planetary gears. If you like having turf mode, that's great, carry on, I have no use for it at all, and would much rather have the simplicity and strength of a direct spool.
 

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Never seen a post about the rear spool failing, but when you bring shift dogs and planetary gears into the mix at the final output, there is a much higher chance of failure, especially when you start bringing high loads and big HP into the mix. You also have much more slop and tolerance in planetary gears, which is easier to break under shock load and stress. The spool also has zero chance to slip, not true with a shift cog and planetary gears. If you like having turf mode, that's great, carry on, I have no use for it at all, and would much rather have the simplicity and strength of a direct spool.
Oh well lets wait and see, we get 2 years Polaris dealer warranty in Spain, if these machines are that weak surely it should show up in that time.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
To be honest I wouldnt want turf mode anyways. I want the rear locked 100% of the time, that way I know 100% of the torque is there all the time. If you spend enough time around the General and Ranger forums you see a ton of people doing what they call a "turf mode delete"

And yeah the constant loading and unloading on the rear would be a problem in high traction scenarios such as asphalt/concrete. What happens is tire roll out catches up to you, a 28.5" tire will travel 745 feet in 100 revolutions, where a 30.5" tire will travel 800 feet in the same 100 revolutions. On loose soil/sand its not an issue.

Where my concern comes in is up front, on the trucks I have had in the past you could disengage wheel hubs or the transfer case so no power is up front and it can freespool like a 2wd truck. With the RZR the front diff is where I wasnt sure how that will handle it because the driveshaft is feeding power to the diff all the time and it has some magic sauce going on with springs, cages, solenoids and whatnot. I wish when you put it in 2wd it would disengage the driveshaft at the rear transmission so its not wasting energy spinning uneeded components.

Im normally not worried about needing to plug a tire, done that enough times, but last year on a ride we had a guy break his wheel and having a spare back at the truck seems like a good idea in case you bust something up.

Thanks for all your information.
 

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Where my concern comes in is up front, on the trucks I have had in the past you could disengage wheel hubs or the transfer case so no power is up front and it can freespool like a 2wd truck. With the RZR the front diff is where I wasnt sure how that will handle it because the driveshaft is feeding power to the diff all the time and it has some magic sauce going on with springs, cages, solenoids and whatnot. I wish when you put it in 2wd it would disengage the driveshaft at the rear transmission so its not wasting energy spinning uneeded components.
Here's the behind the curtain to the magic that's happening if you're curious:

If the front drive isn't engaged ( AWD switch on, rear wheels slipping), the the front tires aren't locked together and the can freewheel independently of each other. The Left and right output hubs are not directly tied to each other, they are linked through the rollers & sprauge, and will only be be linked when the magnet is energized and the armature plate rolls over and locks the rollers into the high spots in the ring gear, which then creates a "locked" drive through an interference drive link (It binds the rollers between the ring gear, which is always driven by the prop shaft, and output hubs). Under heavy load and stress, they can actually still slip through that interference link in AWD, which is what's happening most of the time when people hear their front diff "pop". It has this capability to relieve stress and prevent damage to the front diff, but after so many times, it still takes a toll on the internals and will cause the armature plate finger to bend, strip the slots in the sprauge cage, or bend/break the roll pins that hold the torsion spring, or the tabs on the spring retainer (which is why you see all those parts offered in aftermarket HD options, we're just moving the weak link, and eventually finding what the maximum holding capability is). So, in reference to this particular topic, it would be best to run the small tire on the front, in 2wd, so it can spin independently of the mating wheel, you could still use 4wd in this scenario, but it should be very limited and only used if absolutely necessary, since it would cause excessive stress and repeated slipping in the front drive, which eventually would lead to failure of some sort.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Thanks for that description, it helps.


Here's the behind the curtain to the magic that's happening if you're curious:

If the front drive isn't engaged ( AWD switch on, rear wheels slipping), the the front tires aren't locked together and the can freewheel independently of each other. The Left and right output hubs are not directly tied to each other, they are linked through the rollers & sprauge, and will only be be linked when the magnet is energized and the armature plate rolls over and locks the rollers into the high spots in the ring gear, which then creates a "locked" drive through an interference drive link (It binds the rollers between the ring gear, which is always driven by the prop shaft, and output hubs). Under heavy load and stress, they can actually still slip through that interference link in AWD, which is what's happening most of the time when people hear their front diff "pop". It has this capability to relieve stress and prevent damage to the front diff, but after so many times, it still takes a toll on the internals and will cause the armature plate finger to bend, strip the slots in the sprauge cage, or bend/break the roll pins that hold the torsion spring, or the tabs on the spring retainer (which is why you see all those parts offered in aftermarket HD options, we're just moving the weak link, and eventually finding what the maximum holding capability is). So, in reference to this particular topic, it would be best to run the small tire on the front, in 2wd, so it can spin independently of the mating wheel, you could still use 4wd in this scenario, but it should be very limited and only used if absolutely necessary, since it would cause excessive stress and repeated slipping in the front drive, which eventually would lead to failure of some sort.
 
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