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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Everyone..:

I’m in the process of buying a 2018 1000 EPS 4 seater to go out with family. We made the decision to buy after spending a day out in a rental. The only hiccup happened about 5 miles from the rental shop after we had gotten off the main trail. We came to a stop at a stop sign and the engine died. When we would start it and put it in gear it would die again. We called the rental shop and then came to get us. They told us it was the 5000 mile clutch issue.

Wr were extremely lucky in terms of our location when the clutch decided to start acting up. We were coming down the side of a mountain and the terrain was less than ideal for a clutch issue to occur. Rescue would have been at least a couple of hours wait if we had to use their satellite messenger.

So had this been my machine and the clutch did go out on the mountain or in a location with no cell service, how would I have gotten my family down safely? How would I have gotten my RZR back to my truck? I can change a belt and a tire and plan to carry spares of both. But I’m really scared about having my family out and having a non-field repairable issue occur. Sure I can get a satellite radio or a CB but that only solves half the problem of alerting someone of the situation.

I tried pressing the Polaris sales guy on this exact question and he would not answer, only saying that I should probably never experience anything similar in my own machine.

But now I have experienced it so I’m worried about a worst case scenario. It’s not like there’s AAA for UTVs. So what would you all do? Or what have you previously done? Aside from telling me not to ride solo (which I don’t feel is a realistic expectation for a variety of reasons) how do I self rescue my family and my machine should something like this every happen again?

I’m not letting this derail our decision to purchase but this is a very serious topic that I really hope a community full of experienced owners can help inform me.

Thanks!
Wayne
 

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Option 1, Never ride alone. Option 2 , Never ride anywhere you can't get your truck and trailer to and don't ride farther from your truck than you and your family can hike back to. The fact is that no matter how well you maintain your machine or what kind of machine you have or how many tools and extra parts you carry there is always a possibility that your equipment will fail and not be trail repairable.
 

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I have to agree with the above.

Also you have to decide what level of risk you are willing to take, in anything. This is no different. If you want guaranteed safety don't ride alone, don't ride without phone service, don't ride where you can not walk back to your truck, don't ride at all. I am not trying to sound like an ass, but things happen and you have to be prepared for it. More then 1 time I have had to hike out 2-3 miles because of a broken truck and this was before cell phones.


I have no idea where you live, but does it snow? Do you keep preparedness stuff in your car incase you break down or get stuck? On the UTV is no different. I always keep basic tools and repair parts in the rig. I also have "survival" gear, water, snacks, rain gear, first aid kit, spare batteries, etc.
 

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Another good point is that was a Rental machine. Who knows what kind of abuse that thing has been subjected to in its life.

At least with your own machine you’ll know the abuse and can ensure all your maintenance is done.

I’ve been riding side by sides for 10 years and I’ve never been stranded. (Not saying isnt possible)

I’ve had a clutch completely warp on me while riding and still made back to the truck 8 miles away. Took the clutch cover off and you would have thought the clutch was made of wax haha

Just minimize risk in anyway you can and you’ll be fine.
 

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As others stated, there is risk in anything. Be prepared as much as possible for every situation. I carry survival gear in the RZR with me and am fully capable of hiking out several dozen miles over several days and nights if I had to. Definitely more difficult with family in tow, but doable. Hell, I carry a “get home bag” in my truck in case I ever had to abandon it and head home. Cheap insurance as far as I’m concerned.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
We live in Las Vegas. Snow would never really be an issue for me because if there's snow on the ground, I'm probably skiing. Or any place that I would ride in the winter is at a low enough elevation that snow would not be a factor.

After I posted this question, I started searching around and found some interesting threads about being stranded on the trail. In most of the threads, everyone was with another SXS or they had rolled it, but were able to winch it back on its wheels and ride out. I haven't found anyone on these forums yet who have posted about being 20+ miles out and breaking down on their own. Maybe because they all were already doing what @Nwcid and @Big Rob had recommended in terms on not riding further than they're willing to hike.

Some people posted their bag o' tools that they carry. I'll definitely be ordering some of those items to keep on the machine. The suggestions people were listing are definitely great!

I guess on a similar topic then, how do you know you're pushing the machine too hard for the conditions? For example, on rock crawling sections I don't think I ever got above 10mph--going up or down. But on flats, where it's "fair" conditions, but obviously rocky and bumpy, what would be considered too hard? There was once section of trail where I was doing about 30mph on the way out, but on the way back I was doing closer to 50 because I had seen the trail so I wasn't concerned about sharp turns or dips. Granted, 50 wasn't as smooth as 30, but it wasn't any more jarring than the 5 to 10mph I was doing when rock crawling.
 

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As stated above if you don't want to ever get stranded, don't ride alone. You may need to go with at least 2 other people to be sure you won't be walking, anything off road is unreliable. Don't go farther than you are willing to walk is my moto. If you ride like we do where there is no cell service get a "Spot" type device or carry a satellite phone. Be prepared, Razors have plenty of room to carry enough safety stuff with you if you do have to walk out you should easily have everything you'd need.
 

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We ride solo all the time. Carry all the common tools for basic repairs. The area we ride has good cell coverage. Had to call one time when I got stuck in a mud hole but still had to walk 3 miles to main road to flag down my rescue crew. ( My neighbor and my wife) One thing I learned early on was to carry plenty of water, a few snacks and first aid supplies. Always plan for the worst and hope for the best.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
 

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Carry a SPOT or personnel rescue beacon of some kind. That is what I and the wife did for many of a long days ride. Never had to use it. Was very nice having the option if needed.
 

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I always have major ocd about going on long rides with something breaking down and I have never found a way to just stop worrying! I just keep telling my self the only way not have a issue is to NOT ride... and that is not a option so I just carry everything that would help if something small breaks you down. Everytime we take a trip I start getting anxiety about 2 months b4 the trip it's either worrying about breaking down on the way there or on the way back or during our ride. I just do the all the maintance I can on my stuff and go and hope for the best! I have suffered with anxiety for a long time and I just push through and try to have a good time and not think about it yea I k ow I'm weird....
 

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I ride alone with my family all the time. All you can do is carry as many spare parts and tools as you feel comfortable with, a satellite phone, and enough food and water to keep everyone warm, fed and hydrated. We usually plan our gear around spending 4-5 extra days out in case something happens and rescue takes awhile. That’s 4-5 comfortable days. If I need to I will shoot more food haha.
 

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I nearly always ride alone with my family. A must have for me is my garmin inReach, which is a satellite messaging device with an sos button. Look them up. You can text without cell service and summon help in an emergency. Also required for me is food, water, warm clothing, a rechargeable flashlight, and a firearm. Everyone has their own list but I’d expect to break down at some point and at that time you just have to figure out your best option.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks a lot everyone! Great feedback! The Spot gen 3 seems reasonably priced and is exactly the same device the rental company sent us out with. And their annual fee doesn't seem unreasonable.
 

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++ for the SPOT.

I took one on solo motorcycle trips to 49 states and every province and territory in Canada.
Not only for emergency SAR contact, but my family could watch my progress with 10-minute breadcrumbs, and I could leave a green flag on the map whenever I stopped to camp.

Plus, I now have a permanent detailed SPOTWALLA record of my trips in the cloud that I can review at any time to see when and where I ate lunch that day in North Pole, Alaska, for instance. :p

SPOT Track from Alaska Trip

P.S.
The SPOT Messenger is tough enough to bounce down the highway at 60 mph and keep working.
No, not me or the bike - just the SPOT.
 

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One thing I learned a long time ago.........whatever spare parts I carry with me, will NOT be what breaks out on the trail. So, with that being said, do regular and FULL inspection and maintenance Between rides, replace worn parts, etc. as needed at home. Not a guarantee but it helps.
 

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I have about 10000 miles on my two cars in the last 6 seasons and usually ride with friends. I have seen seven cars that would not make it back to camp. Mine broke the rear axle at the castle nut and the wheel fell off at speed. Yikes. It had to be picked up with a trailer. One broke the front drive shaft and both rear axles becoming a trailer.

The others were all clutch failures. They all made it back with someone to push them to get started “in gear”. Failures on these things are often not something to fix with a miniature motorcycle tool kit. You need a pry bar. Straps. Big hammer. Wire. To get it ready to be towed back. And someone to tow it.
 

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Never ride alone like others have said. Also all the tools you can carry probably won't help much because other than a flat tire or belt you will most likely need parts you don't have.
 

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And when I comes to Breakdowns, a little finesse goes a LOOOOONG way for prevention of shit breaking. A persons big nugget on top helps like hell when used properly
 

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Yea do proper maintaining and dont beat the crap out of it and check over everything more than you should be doing and that will help a ton! Yea breakdown could happen but it can be slowed up also by doing what I just said.
 
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