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I recently purchased a 2013 rzr s le. I was wondering how to adjust the shocks so that when I jump it doesn't nose dive. It seems that maybe the rear shocks are to stiff and throws it into the air more than the front. Is this my problem? Do I adjust the springs or the resevoir.
 

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I recently purchased a 2013 rzr s le. I was wondering how to adjust the shocks so that when I jump it doesn't nose dive. It seems that maybe the rear shocks are to stiff and throws it into the air more than the front. Is this my problem? Do I adjust the springs or the resevoir.
Most of the time it is technique not adjustment. You need to drive through the jump not to the jump. The nose dive is most likely caused by the rear suspension unloading early. That is caused by backing off the throttle early. There is a great video of Robbie Gordon and some guy jumping the same rzr with vastly different outcomes posted on the forums.
 

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hey ya'll watch this....
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Yeah technique has a lot to do with it.. I nosedived at Lil Sahara (video in my signature) because I let off at top and the engine braking just stopped rear tires and BOOM... I jumped alot more that trip feathering peddle (sometimes WOT and you can tear up an axle like this ive heard) and had alot more success.. The length of ramp has to do with it too.. You need a ramp face longer than your RZR... But there is a thread about your rear springs that helps too but I hadnt tried that (IDK where thread is)

Welcome to the forum by the way :welcome1: Good luck
 

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If your shocks are adjustable in both compression ("bump") and rebound you can try reducing the bump dampening and increase the rebound dampening (all in the rears only). Also, reducing the spring preload to zero may help. The premise behind these changes is to make the shock "softer" and compress quicker when the rear wheels encounter the jump and "stiffer" and extend slower as they unload at the crest of the jump. Reducing the preload will allow the back suspension to start its upward travel slightly quicker because of not having to overcome the "pre-loaded" force on the spring.

HOWEVER...as stated above...probably 80% of the "nose dive" issue is related to having a jump that has such a short ramp length that the front is unloaded and beginning to drop while the rear wheels are still being forced upward while still in contact with the ground. A quick stab on the brakes at the last second before the jump then full throttle application will help unweight the front and reduce the tendency.
 
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