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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all, greetings from Central VA. Been reading this forum for a bit before buying our 570 Trail about 10 months ago. Bought it as a base model, have since added Trail Armor doors, Cooter Brown roof, this that or the other storage bag, front windshield, tinted rear windshield, and most recently (30 miles ago) Highlifter lift and Bandit Trail shocks. From past jeeping experience and reading this forum about the bandit shocks, I opted to remove both front and read sway bars which has made the ride the most plush experience. The trails that I ride are tight wooded ATV trails of varying terrains. Creek crossings, ravines, hills, twisty turney, flowey.. typical for the region.

So far, after 180 miles, this little 570 is a freaking GOAT! Hardly ever do I even need to put it in 4WD, because it blasts up hills, ravine ledges, creek banks, etc with ease.

This all said, shortly after doing all of my suspension mods, specifically here this week, I have had some weird grinding noises seemingly coming from the rear drive train. I only hear it when driving slowly and kinda between when the motor is loaded/unloaded. It doesn't affect the low/high gear throttle response or power deliver and only audible really when the drivetrain is lightly loaded. I did some reading on the forums and found some threads RE: brake pad noise. Jacked up the rear and pulled the wheels and found that the outer pads had a fair amount of verticle wiggle room, so I tightened them until the point where wiggle room was minimized and drag was not noticable when turning the wheel. This seems to be the consensus among the threads that I read. I still have it on the lift, so need to check it out tomorrow to see what the verdict is. Any other things that I should check out?

Secondly, I have run the lift so far with zero preload as shipped from Bandit. I am going to adjust the preload here in the next week or two. Any pointers? I read on Bandits FAQ page the sag lengths that should be maintained, but considering the sway bars are removed, any special consideration? Additionally, I have been wondering if limiting straps are something that I should consider. Any thoughts on this? There are a few spots where three/two wheel action happens...

Thanks for all of the info that you guys have put into the forum so far. Thanks for any insightful reply's to this post as well.

Domo
 

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Welcome!

IMO for your ride I would not run limiting straps. Also I would not turn the preload up any with the lift you have, I believe you will find that it would decrease your ride comfort.
 

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Welcome!

IMO for your ride I would not run limiting straps. Also I would not turn the preload up any with the lift you have, I believe you will find that it would decrease your ride comfort.
Along these lines, the only thing you might do to your shocks is set the shocks themselves to a more firm setting to counter the body roll from removing the sway bars. Even then, I only run mine on the firmest setting when running down mostly smooth forest roads. If I know it's slow going or crawling prior to the ride, I soften the setting.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the replies. The trail series look to be fixed valving and do not have compression/rebound settings, only spring stiffness adjustment. Bandit states that the springs are shipped with zero preload, but recommend after settling the suspension, that the front sit .5 - 1" higher than the rear for "best performance". They advise that spring stiffness is based on user need. I think it rides great currently, so maybe I'll just leave it alone for now.

As for the drivetrain noise, I am now convinced that it was the brakes. I tightened them up a bit initially, but then gave them a little more slack and added some bushing thingies to the calipers. I just cut some 18ga stainless strips and needle-nosed/hammered around as some of the other threads recommended. I took it for a shakedown ride through my trails this morning and only heard the slightest faint of noise once or twice during the ride. Might have to doctor the back of the pads too, but fingers crossed that's all it was!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
After cutting off the sway bar links, obviously I was left with a knob there, until I could replace the bolt. My neighbor pointed out that my tire was rubbing the "knob" when turned all the way in either direction. I fixed this today by swapping out with a shorter bolt and removing the knob, but it makes me wonder what limits the steering on these things. I don't see any steering stops around the calipers. Now it seems the steering linkage acts as a stop, but prior to pulling the link ends off, it was rubbing.. I have a PDF manual, but have not completely looked into it yet. I just don't want to inadvertantly flex the CV joints or steering knuckle too hard by steering beyond it's structural limits.
 

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Can't say for sure without knowing your model year and looking it up, but early 570 RZR did not have grease fittings in the outer pivots of the rear suspension. So you had your choice of really squeaky rear suspension, take it apart and lubricate it by hand rear suspension or drill, tap and install zerk fittings rear suspension. Either that or install Garage Products bushings in the suspension and never have to grease it again.

Sent from my S9+ using Tapatalk Pro
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Sorry guys, work has consumed me. It is a base model 2018 570 Trail. I did the break in service maintenance, and greased all of the zirks as part of the process.

I did some more riding since my last post. I think that the drivetrain noise was most certainly the brake pads. I heard it like once or twice since then, but could use to put one more metal strap in each caliper hole to take the last bit of jitter out of the outer stationary pads.

Since removing the stabilizer linkage shock bolts and replacing with shorter bolts, it actually seems to have gained a bit of turning radius (tight trails) since it's not rubbing any more. I still need to look into this to make sure that it is not turning too sharply.

-Domo
 

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Remove your metal Scraps and push the pistons in the caliper and and a dab of quality rtv silicone to the backside of the pads at the caliper contact points. Lightly pump the brake pedal to reseat the pistons. Problem solved. Even though the pads are thin they last a very long time. I rarely even use the brakes as I like using engines braking.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Although the stainless strips seem to have mostly done the trick, I may give the RTV a try. The strips seem secure, but that it still seems a little hacky to me. I like the idea of RTV better.

With most all of my riding being on wooded ATV width trails on moderately hilly terrain, between ravines, creeks, pot-holes, etc, here are numerous instances where one or two wheels leave the ground. I swear it feels like the A-arms are extending enough where I am feeling the end of the shock extension in the steering wheel. Also, it really feels like the suspension (both stock and Bandits) smooth out when riding trails with a bit of speed vs crawling. Although more fun, I am a bit concerned about it's longevity using it like that vs babying it. Still considering limiting straps, but could be worrying too much, I tend to do that. I saw one vote for no straps. Any other input?
 

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Most of my riding is in similar terrain as what you describe and I have not had any issues with the shocks over extending or anything being damaged from a tire or two coming off the ground. If this is happening primarily while you are crawling, the suspension isn't dropping fast enough or hard enough to damage anything in my experience. Taking the Rzr off a jump or hauling butt through a section of whoops would be a much more violent compression and rebounding of the shocks/suspension than crawling is. These shocks are built tough and to handle being bottomed and topped out. I would not worry about limiting straps. If it was a concern than every ATV, dirtbike, and UTV out there would have them or the aftermarket would be pawning them off on us left and right.

If I am remembering correctly, the main reasons for the use of limiting straps in the Jeep/automotive off road world is to prevent U-joints binding at excessive angles causing potential broken axles, to prevent coil springs from being lifted out of their buckets, and to prevent the more fragile automotive shocks from being over extended and bending a rod or breaking a seal.

There is a big difference between the standard automotive shocks designed just to dampen oscillations vs the coil over off road shocks on UTV's that are designed to hold the weight of the vehicle and dampen oscillations. More like the difference between a shock absorber and a strut in function.

With all that said, it is definitely not going to hurt anything to put limiting straps on it either. If it makes you feel better while riding instead of constantly worrying about over extending something then it will be money well spent. You gotta do what lets you sleep at night haha.
 

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I recently installed 1.5 forward arms on my 800 trail, with the addition of these and the 1.5" lift my cheap eastlake replacement axles were extended to the point they would bind at full droop and the hub wouldn't turn. Additionally I have the upgraded rack from SuperATV and the driver side rod end would bind just before I was able to get it under the knuckle to connect it. Based on those two things I installed 15" SuperATV limit straps on my front shocks to prevent damage to the steering and popping axles. It essentially only stopped 3/4" of droop and makes me feel better knowing that I wont have binding in the axles or steering. You can see the 3/8" spacer I installed on the top shock bolt to get the strap away from the shock mount. I also replace the shock bolts with M10x1.5x85 mm grade 12.9 fasteners to ensure I had plenty of shoulder for the shock and plenty of thread for the strap.

my 2 pennies.

646095
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Also these straps were 20 bucks cheaper on ebay scratch and dent versus SATV website...


 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks for the info and insight guys. Bandits recommendation for them was what got me to thinking about it. My biggest concern was the downward force/weight of tires and a-arms during full extension over time. I realize that bandit has to CYA with their warranty coverage considering that unsprung weight will vary from machine to machine depending on mods. Considering that my tires are stock currently, I'll probably hold off for now. I'll listen for any u-joint binding over time as well. So far so good on that front.

Thanks,

Domo
 
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