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Discussion Starter #1
COVID-19 UPDATE – DON’T BE GROUND ZERO
DON’T BE GROUND ZERO
Many of my colleagues in the recreation advocacy/management profession have been working hard to encourage and inspire motorized and non-motorized trail enthusiasts to follow the “Stay at Home” directives being issued by local, state, and federal authorities to help Flatten the Curve of Covid-19 infections.
As you know, our frontline healthcare workers and 1st responders place themselves in harm’s way every day to take care of a compounding number of very sick and/or critically ill Covid-19 patients. Many of them are asked to work long hours with limited amounts of PPE.
Rural government officials including a number of sheriffs and county supervisors are asking visitors to honor those stay at home orders and postpone your backcountry adventures until the nation gets a handle on the Covid-19 crisis.
Here are a couple of reasons for those requests.
DON’T BRING THE VIRUS TO WHERE WE LIVE – With an apparent large number of infected people being asymptomatic (showing no sign of any disease), why would trail enthusiasts want to be the “ground zero” for introducing the coronavirus to our friends, healthcare workers, and law enforcement officials who live and work in largely uninfected rural areas of the country?
DON’T TAKE NON-ESSENTIAL OUTDOOR RISKS - Trail enthusiasts of all persuasions understand that participation in the sport comes with inherent risks. Many of those injuries are critical and can require medical evacuation to a hospital where you will unnecessarily place yourself and others in danger of infection or require hospital staff – who are already maxed out taking care of Covid-19 patients – to address your self-inflicted injuries. If you get lost, the local Search and Rescue may not be able to respond due to staffing shortages.
There is a growing consensus in the outdoor recreation advocacy corps that the best short-term advice is for us to avoid traveling long distances to recreate but rather utilize local opportunities to get some fresh air and exercise while practicing social distancing.
Responsible recreation means that we have an obligation to be good stewards and show respect for other trail users and our land management partners. Part of that responsibility is to respect temporary unit closures.
When the Covid-19 book is written, let’s hope the recreation community is credited for doing its part to Flatten the Curve vs. being cited as the “Ground Zero” infector of a rural community.
# # #
Posted by Don Amador at 8:38 AM
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Labels: covid-19, qwr land management, rural tourism
 

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COVID-19 UPDATE – DON’T BE GROUND ZERO
DON’T BE GROUND ZERO
Many of my colleagues in the recreation advocacy/management profession have been working hard to encourage and inspire motorized and non-motorized trail enthusiasts to follow the “Stay at Home” directives being issued by local, state, and federal authorities to help Flatten the Curve of Covid-19 infections.
As you know, our frontline healthcare workers and 1st responders place themselves in harm’s way every day to take care of a compounding number of very sick and/or critically ill Covid-19 patients. Many of them are asked to work long hours with limited amounts of PPE.
Rural government officials including a number of sheriffs and county supervisors are asking visitors to honor those stay at home orders and postpone your backcountry adventures until the nation gets a handle on the Covid-19 crisis.
Here are a couple of reasons for those requests.
DON’T BRING THE VIRUS TO WHERE WE LIVE – With an apparent large number of infected people being asymptomatic (showing no sign of any disease), why would trail enthusiasts want to be the “ground zero” for introducing the coronavirus to our friends, healthcare workers, and law enforcement officials who live and work in largely uninfected rural areas of the country?
DON’T TAKE NON-ESSENTIAL OUTDOOR RISKS - Trail enthusiasts of all persuasions understand that participation in the sport comes with inherent risks. Many of those injuries are critical and can require medical evacuation to a hospital where you will unnecessarily place yourself and others in danger of infection or require hospital staff – who are already maxed out taking care of Covid-19 patients – to address your self-inflicted injuries. If you get lost, the local Search and Rescue may not be able to respond due to staffing shortages.
There is a growing consensus in the outdoor recreation advocacy corps that the best short-term advice is for us to avoid traveling long distances to recreate but rather utilize local opportunities to get some fresh air and exercise while practicing social distancing.
Responsible recreation means that we have an obligation to be good stewards and show respect for other trail users and our land management partners. Part of that responsibility is to respect temporary unit closures.
When the Covid-19 book is written, let’s hope the recreation community is credited for doing its part to Flatten the Curve vs. being cited as the “Ground Zero” infector of a rural community.
# # #
Posted by Don Amador at 8:38 AM
Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to FacebookShare to Pinterest
Labels: covid-19, qwr land management, rural tourism
COVID-19 UPDATE – DON’T BE GROUND ZERO
DON’T BE GROUND ZERO
Many of my colleagues in the recreation advocacy/management profession have been working hard to encourage and inspire motorized and non-motorized trail enthusiasts to follow the “Stay at Home” directives being issued by local, state, and federal authorities to help Flatten the Curve of Covid-19 infections.
As you know, our frontline healthcare workers and 1st responders place themselves in harm’s way every day to take care of a compounding number of very sick and/or critically ill Covid-19 patients. Many of them are asked to work long hours with limited amounts of PPE.
Rural government officials including a number of sheriffs and county supervisors are asking visitors to honor those stay at home orders and postpone your backcountry adventures until the nation gets a handle on the Covid-19 crisis.
Here are a couple of reasons for those requests.
DON’T BRING THE VIRUS TO WHERE WE LIVE – With an apparent large number of infected people being asymptomatic (showing no sign of any disease), why would trail enthusiasts want to be the “ground zero” for introducing the coronavirus to our friends, healthcare workers, and law enforcement officials who live and work in largely uninfected rural areas of the country?
DON’T TAKE NON-ESSENTIAL OUTDOOR RISKS - Trail enthusiasts of all persuasions understand that participation in the sport comes with inherent risks. Many of those injuries are critical and can require medical evacuation to a hospital where you will unnecessarily place yourself and others in danger of infection or require hospital staff – who are already maxed out taking care of Covid-19 patients – to address your self-inflicted injuries. If you get lost, the local Search and Rescue may not be able to respond due to staffing shortages.
There is a growing consensus in the outdoor recreation advocacy corps that the best short-term advice is for us to avoid traveling long distances to recreate but rather utilize local opportunities to get some fresh air and exercise while practicing social distancing.
Responsible recreation means that we have an obligation to be good stewards and show respect for other trail users and our land management partners. Part of that responsibility is to respect temporary unit closures.
When the Covid-19 book is written, let’s hope the recreation community is credited for doing its part to Flatten the Curve vs. being cited as the “Ground Zero” infector of a rural community.
# # #
Posted by Don Amador at 8:38 AM
Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to FacebookShare to Pinterest
Labels: covid-19, qwr land management, rural tourism
This post is right on target,thank you so much for bringing it to everyones attention.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Tell that to those who have family members that died. Your response is very interesting. Reminds me of the animal that sticks head in sand to avoid trouble. This is extremely serious stuff. Death is very hard to come back from. There is some evidence that is can be air borne. Every follow someone in an auto that smokes with there widow down and have the smoke come in your car up your nose? Riding in line may not be safe right now. Too much still unknown.
 

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Just let it go......
There have been multiple life flights incidents in Colorado and Utah from OHV accidents in the last two weeks. They are straining a medical community in small towns that are already overloaded.
No one plans on an accident, but they happen. That's why Public Officials in many Western states are closing trail heads and telling people to stay home.
People are going to do what they want, and I've read the comments, from camping and riding is just as safe as staying home, it's my Constitutional right, etc.
To me, those are all self serving and people just putting their recreation in front of public safety.
Sooner or later, if the virus continues to spread, some of those comments will come back to haunt those that made them.
 

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Tell that to those who have family members that died. Your response is very interesting. Reminds me of the animal that sticks head in sand to avoid trouble. This is extremely serious stuff. Death is very hard to come back from. There is some evidence that is can be air borne. Every follow someone in an auto that smokes with there widow down and have the smoke come in your car up your nose? Riding in line may not be safe right now. Too much still unknown.
I haven't responded so you don't know anything about what I think on the subject You probably don't what to know that's why I said let it go. You made your PSA announcement now let it be done.
 

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There have been multiple life flights incidents in Colorado and Utah from OHV accidents in the last two weeks. They are straining a medical community in small towns that are already overloaded.
No one plans on an accident, but they happen. That's why Public Officials in many Western states are closing trail heads and telling people to stay home.
People are going to do what they want, and I've read the comments, from camping and riding is just as safe as staying home, it's my Constitutional right, etc.
To me, those are all self serving and people just putting their recreation in front of public safety.
Sooner or later, if the virus continues to spread, some of those comments will come back to haunt those that made them.
I really hope you are not referring to me as I have said nothing on the subject about traveling, riding, etc...
 

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I haven't responded so you don't know anything about what I think on the subject You probably don't what to know that's why I said let it go. You made your PSA announcement now let it be done.
Why did you say anything then? Since you want to be heard let's hear it.You opened your mouth so finish your thought.You're acting like a woman,lol.
 

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Original post is spot on. However, it will never happen here in East TN. Windrock, and all of TWRA including the Royal Blue section trails are open for all to ride 24-7.
 

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JFYI - We cancelled our spring club ride that was planned 6 months prior because we play by the rules. No big deal because the "Stay at home" orders should be adhered to.

Why did you say anything then? Since you want to be heard let's hear it.You opened your mouth so finish your thought.You're acting like a woman,lol.
You asked....


FastStats

The top 10 causes of death

Let those numbers sink in for a minute

The point being there are a LOT more people dying from other things and they have not caused the panic COVID-19 has. It's about numbers.....live in fear if you want....

Said my peace, I'm out of this one.
 

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The Covid-19 models currently being used by the White House Admin are projecting 100,000 - 200,000 deaths in the USA. One of the models cited by White House spokersons is the IHME model which predicts 80,000 deaths by August, 2020. However, they are changing their statistical models daily.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Coronavirus: Oregon, Washington close all national forest sites, trails across 24M acres
The closures cover around 24 million acres of forest, mountains and coast spread across 17 national forests.

Author: Zach Urness Salem Statesman Journal
Published: 6:19 PM PDT March 27, 2020
Updated: 6:19 PM PDT March 27, 2020
The Pacific Northwest is closing outdoor recreation on a scale never previously imagined.
In the quest to contain COVID-19, and follow state-issued orders for people to stay home, the U.S. Forest Service will close all developed recreation sites across both Oregon and Washington in coming days, the agency announced Friday.
The closures cover around 24 million acres of forest, mountains and coast spread across 17 national forests, two National Scenic Areas, a national grassland, and two National Volcanic Monuments.
The shutdown includes all hiking trails, campgrounds, sno-parks, boat ramps and OHV riding areas — any place that is considered a "developed recreation site," officials said.
Coupled with the closure of Oregon and Washington's state parks — in addition to many local and county parks — and there are precious few places remaining for outdoor recreation.
"Recreation sites are closing to protect staff and the communities we serve and slow the spread of COVID-19," said Michelle Mitchell, assistant director for recreation in Region 6 of the Forest Service. "Washington and Oregon are aligning operations to support the states' governors executive orders for residents to, 'stay home, stay safe and save lives.'"
The details of the closure, and how it's implemented, will be left up to the individual forests, officials said, and some of the details could differ.
In the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, the entire forest is closed — even to dispersed and off-trail exploring.
"Bushwacking into the backcountry is not allowed," spokeswoman Rachel Pawlitz said.
In other forests, including Mount Hood and Deschutes national forests, dispersed use will be open but not encouraged.
Dispersed use generally means driving on a Forest Service road to a remote location to camp or fish or bushwhack.
"If a hiker or climber gets into trouble in the forest, response times will likely be longer and operating at a lower capacity," said Heather Ibsen, spokesperson for Mt. Hood National Forest. "Working emergency responders are also trying to focus on keeping their local communities and healthcare providers safe during the COVID-19 outbreak."
Is BLM closing its lands as well?
The other major federal land management agency in the Northwest, the Bureau of Land Management, is also closing its campgrounds, some day-use sites and restrooms, the agency said in a news release.
However, the BLM, which manages much of the desert in Eastern Oregon, said there are still plenty of areas to explore.
BLM will keep open the trails and wide-open spaces often used for recreation, it said.
"Multiple opportunities remain for the public to enjoy the outdoors as long as visitors heed orders, guidance, and advice of local and state officials and the Centers for Disease Control," BLM said in a news release.
Zach Urness has been an outdoors reporter, photographer and videographer in Oregon for 12 years. To support his work, subscribe to the Statesman Journal. Urness can be reached at [email protected] or (503) 399-6801. Find him on Twitter at @ZachsORoutdoors.
This article was originally published by the Salem Statesman Journal, one of more than a dozen news organizations throughout the state sharing their coverage of the novel coronavirus outbreak to help inform Oregonians about this evolving heath issue.
RELATED: U.S. Forest Service closing all trails in Columbia River Gorge
RELATED: Connecting with nature, even just looking out the window, can reduce stress and anxiety
 

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JFYI - We cancelled our spring club ride that was planned 6 months prior because we play by the rules. No big deal because the "Stay at home" orders should be adhered to.



You asked....


FastStats

The top 10 causes of death

Let those numbers sink in for a minute

The point being there are a LOT more people dying from other things and they have not caused the panic COVID-19 has. It's about numbers.....live in fear if you want....

Said my peace, I'm out of this one.
That wasn't so hard was it?BTW I'm a technician for the phone company so I'm out every day.I'm in my 50's and smoke and drink. I'm taking precautions but I'm not on the bandwagon with everything that's shut down.
 
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