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Discussion Starter #1
Just started our third week of RZR bliss. I'm now getting out into some fairly steep (for me) terrain, and have a question about the best way to descend steep trails.

Does letting the engine idle and descending on the brake alone damage the belt? Something in the drive case whistles, I am assuming it is the belt as it travels over a not-engaged clutch/pulley. I'm wondering whether that is burnishing the belt.

I've tried to keep the belt engaged by using the engine in low at about 3k, but that is faster that I want to go down some of these trails.

Is that whistling normal?

This noob welcomes any advice on this. Thanks!
-Al
 

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Hi, I randomly came upon this thread while searching for posts about brake pads.

I don’t know what machine you have, I have a ‘14 XP1000. When descending steep trails I keep it in low, and use both feet. It’s a bit counterintuitive, but using a bit of gas to keep the clutch engaged while also using the brake to control speed is my method.

Of course, I don’t know how steep you trail is and how slow you need to go, but honestly 3k seems like way more RPM than you need to keep the clutch engaged. Many step grades can be accomplished with very little brake application, by using just enough gas to keep the clutch engaged.


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Thanks, Wheel. I've got a 2020 XP 1000 TRE. I had tried using brakes downhill, and low range low RPM, just trying to get the belt engaged. Since the Polaris engine doesn't do effective engine braking (something they put right in their specs), just using the engine sometimes got faster than I wanted.

For some reason I had never tried using both together. Until this morning! Worked great. Thanks very much for the hint.

-Al
 

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Two feet for me too. Always be ready to blip the throttle, even on a steep descent, so you can get the clutch re-engaged for engine braking. Braking alone on a steep descent can be squirrelly.
 
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I spend a lot of time driving with both feet. This platform is very well-suited to the 2-foot method in low-speed maneuvering and high-speed attack.

Losing the clutch while braking into a turn at speed upsets the car. Staying on the gas pretty much at all times, with correct modulation and brake input is the best way to keep it stable and pointed in the right direction. Enjoy!!!!


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Two foot method is correct, and very effective, but be aware, that if you don't have a tune that removes the two foot limits, it will eventually throw a two foot diagnostic code and send the machine into limp mode for a bit.

Also, in regards to the belt, two foot driving does put some additional strain on your belt, nothing to be concerned with if its not excessive, but if you get careless with it, you can kill a belt in a hurry ( like doing burnouts for instance ). Idling upon decent doesn't hurt your belt at all, the whistle you're hearing is actually the secondary clutch squeezing the belt from wheel speed, and opposed to the primary squeezing it like normal, it's not anything to be concerned with as it doesn't generate any heat or slippage since the primary isn't engaged.
 
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