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Having a friendly debate is pointless because you can’t seem to grasp the concept. You can’t compare dirt tires to paddles in terms of clutching. It doesn’t matter if the dirt tires are taller or heavier. They have very little drag compared to paddles, yes paddles that are lighter have far more drag. There is also far more width adding to that drag on a paddle tires. And when you talk a heavy paddle that drag and loss of power only increases. So again you can’t say that because the stock clutch is geared for a 32” dirt tire that it automatically is geared for a lighter 32” paddle tire. That simply doesn’t carry over or translate. Sure it can work, hell you can probably put 35” paddle tires and get around. However, your ideal rpm range will be out of wack, your power to the ground will be far less, your belt temps will be increased and you’ll have more wear and tear on all drive components as well as the engine. Just clutch it right for 32” paddles and that clutching isn’t stock, the true fix is actually a 10% gear reduction in the diff. Or just run a 30” paddle, your stock gearing and clutching will translate far better to it. You’ll have better performance, lower temps, and be able to hold your rpm in peak power easier. I’ll put money on that all day. Go try to have this argument with Airdam, good luck.
 

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Having a friendly debate is pointless because you can’t seem to grasp the concept. You can’t compare dirt tires to paddles in terms of clutching. It doesn’t matter if the dirt tires are taller or heavier. They have very little drag compared to paddles, yes paddles that are lighter have far more drag. There is also far more width adding to that drag on a paddle tires. And when you talk a heavy paddle that drag and loss of power only increases. So again you can’t say that because the stock clutch is geared for a 32” dirt tire that it automatically is geared for a lighter 32” paddle tire. That simply doesn’t carry over or translate. Sure it can work, hell you can probably put 35” paddle tires and get around. However, your ideal rpm range will be out of wack, your power to the ground will be far less, your belt temps will be increased and you’ll have more wear and tear on all drive components as well as the engine. Just clutch it right for 32” paddles and that clutching isn’t stock, the true fix is actually a 10% gear reduction in the diff. Or just run a 30” paddle, your stock gearing and clutching will translate far better to it. You’ll have better performance, lower temps, and be able to hold your rpm in peak power easier. I’ll put money on that all day. Go try to have this argument with Airdam, good luck.


I can have a friendly debate all day. I understand the concepts quite well and understand how paddle tires work. You started with a rotational mass argument, which then changed to gear changes in the transmission.

Never said the clutching was perfect for a 32” paddle tire. The stock clutching will work just fine for the OPs application and for a majority of people.

Yes changing the gearing would be more ideal. Just like changing gear on a truck when you go to bigger tires. People will do as clutching is cheaper and easier to do.

Your also assuming the Turbo S will not be in peak rpm range with all 32” paddle tires set ups. You seem to be in a drag race up a hill mindset and I am in a duning mindset.

How is a car that is designed around a 32” heavy dirt tire going to have more strain on components when you stick to the same size tire, but in a much lighter set up. Logic says lighter would be less strain. Yes going to a similar weight paddle tire with an aggressive paddle will create similar or more strain.

Once the paddle tires are up on the sand they are floating on top and only a small portion of the paddle is digging in the sand.

Yes clutch kits if tuned properly will extend belt life. Clutch alignment and the way someone drives will be a greater factor.

There is a give and take on performance with paddles. I personally think the benefits of running a 32” paddle tire on a Turbo S is worth what very little performance you think they are losing.







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How is a car that is designed around a 32” heavy dirt tire going to have more strain on components when you stick to the same size tire, but in a much lighter set up. Logic says lighter would be less strain. Yes going to a similar weight paddle tire with an aggressive paddle will create similar or more strain.
Logic would be wrong lol. It’s called friction. Most paddle tires are 12-15” wide scooping sand. Dirt tires are what 8-10” wide in most cases riding on hard packed dirt. Which is why rotational mass comes in play on paddles far more than on dirt tires; the less rotational mass with that much ground contact (friction) the better.

Also I’m sure you know but on all turbo motors clutch alignment isn’t a factor. As in it is permanently set and not adjustable.
 

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How is a car that is designed around a 32” heavy dirt tire going to have more strain on components when you stick to the same size tire, but in a much lighter set up. Logic says lighter would be less strain. Yes going to a similar weight paddle tire with an aggressive paddle will create similar or more strain.
Logic would be wrong lol. It’s called friction. Most paddle tires are 12-15” wide scooping sand. Dirt tires are what 8-10” wide in most cases riding on hard packed dirt. Which is why rotational mass comes in play on paddles far more than on dirt tires; the less rotational mass with that much ground contact (friction) the better.

Also I’m sure you know but on all turbo motors clutch alignment isn’t a factor. As in it is permanently set and not adjustable.


Of course clutch alignment is still a factor. It can be off and aligned. Some machining or shimming is required.

That evil friction. If you don’t go with an aggressive paddle a lot less friction. The CST is not an aggressive paddle and floats on top of the sand.


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How is a car that is designed around a 32” heavy dirt tire going to have more strain on components when you stick to the same size tire, but in a much lighter set up. Logic says lighter would be less strain. Yes going to a similar weight paddle tire with an aggressive paddle will create similar or more strain.
Logic would be wrong lol. It’s called friction. Most paddle tires are 12-15” wide scooping sand. Dirt tires are what 8-10” wide in most cases riding on hard packed dirt. Which is why rotational mass comes in play on paddles far more than on dirt tires; the less rotational mass with that much ground contact (friction) the better.

Also I’m sure you know but on all turbo motors clutch alignment isn’t a factor. As in it is permanently set and not adjustable.


Of course clutch alignment is still a factor. It can be off and aligned. Some machining or shimming is required.

That evil friction. If you don’t go with an aggressive paddle a lot less friction. The CST is not an aggressive paddle and floats on top of the sand.




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Rephrase, yes clutch alignment is a factor, but on the turbo it just bolts together and is auto aligned So essentially is a non-factor. You can’t adjust it, unless you’re willing to machine your motor and diff cases. I have never heard of a turbo being out of alignment or anyone machining it. I wouldn’t risk machining the cases, I’d be talking with Polaris to get corrected and hopefully under warranty. The xp1000 alignment can be adjusted.

Agree on less aggressive tire.

Alright it’s been fun, I’m out.
 
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