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I am the proud new owner of a 2019 RZR Turbo S 4. I am nothing but happy with the performance. I just did my first trip to Little Sahara dunes yesterday, and it seems clear that I need to invest in some sand tires. My plan is to buy 4 sand tires and 4 bead lock rims. I want to put the sand paddles on the OEM rims (15 x 10 I believe) and switch the OEM tires to the new bead lock rims. How wide can I go with the rear paddles on the OEM rims? Any advantage/disadvantage to going to a 30" sand tire on those rims? I spent way too much money on the SXS, so budget is also something I have to consider. Any info is appreciated, TIA
 

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Sand tires are very helpful. There are expensive ones and cheap ones. The expensive ones are usually thinner, but little sahara has enough stick and stuff in the trail areas that I went with cheap ones. I got mine from mudthrowers. They have combo deals where they come already mounted. I kept my paddles on the beadlocks for airing down.
 

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Do you really have to have the paddles? I know for my much lower power 900 they help a lot, but I would assume you can do well without them in the dunes if you air down enough. Even on my 900 I could still go everywhere with the stock bighorns, just not as quickly. I am hoping when I upgrade to a turbo S I can skip the paddle swap hassle and expense.

As a side note if you do go with paddles consider the overall weight. I think the performance improvement in my paddles is half from the paddles and half from the very light weight setup with douglas aluminum rims.

I also only ride smaller dunes in Michigan, sure they don’t compare to real dunes out west, so that is a consideration.

Tom


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Do you really have to have the paddles? I know for my much lower power 900 they help a lot, but I would assume you can do well without them in the dunes if you air down enough. Even on my 900 I could still go everywhere with the stock bighorns, just not as quickly. I am hoping when I upgrade to a turbo S I can skip the paddle swap hassle and expense.

As a side note if you do go with paddles consider the overall weight. I think the performance improvement in my paddles is half from the paddles and half from the very light weight setup with douglas aluminum rims.

I also only ride smaller dunes in Michigan, sure they don’t compare to real dunes out west, so that is a consideration.

Tom


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They aren’t completely necessary for small dunes, but they up the fun factor in my experience. Better handling and faster launches.
 

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Not worth it to us. 2017 XP1000, 2018 Turbo Dynamix running stock tires. We go anywhere and up anything we point at on Oregon dunes. Nice to not worry about tearing up paddles on hard or paved roads. Can ride anywhere in this area without the expense and worry of changing wheels. Now when we go to Utah we will have to buy tires that will with stand rocks. Big horns will not. We run little under 10psi with 4wd. We do not have the need to out drag anyone.
 

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Not worth it to us. 2017 XP1000, 2018 Turbo Dynamix running stock tires. We go anywhere and up anything we point at on Oregon dunes. Nice to not worry about tearing up paddles on hard or paved roads. Can ride anywhere in this area without the expense and worry of changing wheels. Now when we go to Utah we will have to buy tires that will with stand rocks. Big horns will not. We run little under 10psi with 4wd. We do not have the need to out drag anyone.
Bighorns do exceptionally well for what they are in the dunes. However, if you no longer have big horns, you will suffer greatly. All-around terrain type tires that most people tend to run do horrible in the dunes. Don't matter if they're BFG, Tensor, Tusk, ITP or whatever. So if that's the style tires you have, yes I would recommend paddles. If you have big horns still and dunes are just an occasional thing for you, stick with the big horns and don't spend the money on paddles.
 

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I can tell you that you will get way better gas mileage with paddles and smoothies than big horns. If you plan on long rides you'll definitely want to change out the Big Horns. I bought a used set of sand tires on wheels off Craigs List after it happened to us. Thank goodness our friends brought extra gas. We were a long way from camp when that happened to us.
 

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I can tell you that you will get way better gas mileage with paddles and smoothies than big horns. If you plan on long rides you'll definitely want to change out the Big Horns. I bought a used set of sand tires on wheels off Craigs List after it happened to us. Thank goodness our friends brought extra gas. We were a long way from camp when that happened to us.
Must have been one long run. We run all day, only gas once a day. Can buy lots of gas for the cost of 12 tires and wheels and then there is the storage space required and trouble changing 3 machines. Big horns serve us very well.
 

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Are they 100% necessary? No. But they do definitely make it more fun.

I've run my 2016 XP4 1000 with stock Big Horns, 28" STI Sand Drifts on 7" wide wheels, and 30" CST Sand Blasts on 8" wide front / 10" wide rear wheels.
The Big Horns certainly got me everywhere I wanted to go but didn't handle near as good and it certainly isn't as fast.
The STI Sand Drifts on 7" wide wheels was not a good combo for the weight of a 4-seat machine. It simply didn't float well enough and wasn't enough paddle. The handling, however, was great.
The CST Sand Blasts on the wider wheels is a great setup for my machine. It floats great, puts the power down better, handles great. I'm really happy with the setup. I only ride the dunes a couple of weekends a year but the new wheels and tires were worth the money in my opinion.

For a Turbo S, I would highly recommend going with 32" paddles over 30's as they're geared and clutched for a larger tire anyway. Weight is huge when it comes to a paddle tire setup. For a great budget tire the CST Sand Blasts are the way to go. But I wouldn't recommend running them on stock wheels as they're too narrow and I'd recommend bead locks so you can drop the pressure down where you want it and not worry about popping the tire off the bead.
 

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I've ran the dunes with paddle tires and dirt... hands down, the paddle tires provide better control and traction. Dirt tires were a little more fun, because they made it easier to slide in to corners, though.
 

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For a Turbo S, I would highly recommend going with 32" paddles over 30's as they're geared and clutched for a larger tire anyway. Weight is huge when it comes to a paddle tire setup. For a great budget tire the CST Sand Blasts are the way to go. But I wouldn't recommend running them on stock wheels as they're too narrow and I'd recommend bead locks so you can drop the pressure down where you want it and not worry about popping the tire off the bead.
Turbo S is not set up for 32" paddles. 32" dirt tires that are 7" wide yes. Not paddles that 13" wide trying to scoop sand. If you have a Turbo S, your car will transfer better to 30" paddles without modifying the clutch or diff.
 

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As you can see TLLUT, there are almost as many opinions on this subject as there are stars in the sky. I understand budget, but you only want to do this one time, so doing it right, first, is a heck of a lot cheaper than doing it twice.

Your Coyotes get you around, this is true. Do yourself a favor and take the old bathroom scale out to the garage, jack it up, take one off and weigh it. You will find they are not light, not by any stretch. If you are at Little Sahara Ok., that is one thing. In Utah...yep...ya need paddles.
If you save a little longer and buy higher end tires it is not impossible to drop a lot of unsprung weight from the car. As an example, if your Coyotes weigh 45lbs each and you find a set of sand tires on aluminum wheels that come in at 30 lbs each you hare dropping 60 lbs off of the machine...and it is unsprung. That is a big deal. Those tires out there at the end of all the spinning stuff are like extra flywheels...they take power to get rolling...and power to keep digging.

Paddle tires are a compromise, between flotation and traction. If you are a recreational guy you don't need the tire with the fast launch. Fewer paddles, takes you a bit longer to launch but your speed will be faster. More paddles, launch harder but you use up power throwing sand behind you.

The ideal tire is going to be as narrow as possible that maintains flotation, with the right number of paddles, and light enough to keep the weight down.
Don't just do what everyone else is doing, educate yourself, buy once...get the right set up, your belt will thank you, your car will run stronger...etc.

I would start by calling Fullerton Sand Tires and asking them. Tell the man what ya got, where ya run, and then listen. To make it even more confusing there are options for front tires that might have you remember that you are 4x4...might be worth letting that front axle help...and paddle design for turning..
And then, if you really want to step, call Xtreme Tire Co. Not cheap, but an amazing product. I have seen them run and leave some folks shocked. Again, tell them what you have, where you ride, etc.
One last thing...remember what your trailer width is. Buying 10 inch wide rims with a ton of offset can quickly make your S too wide to fit on of in a trailer. Swapping out wheels every time you load unload is no fun.


My 2 cents worth....
 

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For a Turbo S, I would highly recommend going with 32" paddles over 30's as they're geared and clutched for a larger tire anyway. Weight is huge when it comes to a paddle tire setup. For a great budget tire the CST Sand Blasts are the way to go. But I wouldn't recommend running them on stock wheels as they're too narrow and I'd recommend bead locks so you can drop the pressure down where you want it and not worry about popping the tire off the bead.
Turbo S is not set up for 32" paddles. 32" dirt tires that are 7" wide yes. Not paddles that 13" wide trying to scoop sand. If you have a Turbo S, your car will transfer better to 30" paddles without modifying the clutch or diff.
The Turbo S works perfectly fine with 32" paddle tires, in fact much better than 30" paddle tires. Why would you want to give up ground clearance with going to a smaller paddle tire? You don't don't need to clutch for 32" paddle tires and it is already clutched to run 32" tires.

To the OP - if you want to stick to the stock wheels for a paddle tires, then I suggest you look at the 32" CST sandblast set up. You can put them on the OEM 7" wheels no problem and they will be fine. Plus they don't cost a lot and are durable light weight set up for a molded tire.

The stock ITP Coyotes suck in the sand. My friend ran them last season in Glamis on his 4 seat turbo S. They don't hold lines going across the dunes very well and sink when you slow down. My other friend with a 4 seat turbo S ran 32" Sandcraft 10 paddle skats and a night and day difference over the stock tires.
 

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The Turbo S works perfectly fine with 32" paddle tires, in fact much better than 30" paddle tires. Why would you want to give up ground clearance with going to a smaller paddle tire? You don't don't need to clutch for 32" paddle tires and it is already clutched to run 32" tires.

To the OP - if you want to stick to the stock wheels for a paddle tires, then I suggest you look at the 32" CST sandblast set up. You can put them on the OEM 7" wheels no problem and they will be fine. Plus they don't cost a lot and are durable light weight set up for a molded tire.

The stock ITP Coyotes suck in the sand. My friend ran them last season in Glamis on his 4 seat turbo S. They don't hold lines going across the dunes very well and sink when you slow down. My other friend with a 4 seat turbo S ran 32" Sandcraft 10 paddle skats and a night and day difference over the stock tires.
Lol, I love a good debate. There's a huge difference from 32" paddles to 32" dirt tires. Stock clutching, while it will work, doesn't translate too well to 32" paddles. You will run far hotter belt temps, you'll struggle to put the power to the sand at many times. If you want to run 32" paddles and stock clutching go ahead. Not to mention the increased rotational mass and weight with 32" paddles. You'll find that 30" will do much better on all the above. But hey don't take my word for it, talk to Adam at Airdam Clutches, who knows more about these clutches probably than any other single person in the world. He's where I get my info from.

Ground clearance while appreciated isn't much of an issue in the sand. Ground clearance comes into play in rocky terrain, not soft sand. You'll have plenty of ground clearance with 30" paddles in sand.

I also wouldn't run a 7" rim on wide paddles tires (at least on the rear). I'd take it to a 8 or 9". Many people like 10 for the increased width, but you don't have to.
 

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The Turbo S works perfectly fine with 32" paddle tires, in fact much better than 30" paddle tires. Why would you want to give up ground clearance with going to a smaller paddle tire? You don't don't need to clutch for 32" paddle tires and it is already clutched to run 32" tires.

To the OP - if you want to stick to the stock wheels for a paddle tires, then I suggest you look at the 32" CST sandblast set up. You can put them on the OEM 7" wheels no problem and they will be fine. Plus they don't cost a lot and are durable light weight set up for a molded tire.

The stock ITP Coyotes suck in the sand. My friend ran them last season in Glamis on his 4 seat turbo S. They don't hold lines going across the dunes very well and sink when you slow down. My other friend with a 4 seat turbo S ran 32" Sandcraft 10 paddle skats and a night and day difference over the stock tires.
Lol, I love a good debate. There's a huge difference from 32" paddles to 32" dirt tires. Stock clutching, while it will work, doesn't translate too well to 32" paddles. You will run far hotter belt temps, you'll struggle to put the power to the sand at many times. If you want to run 32" paddles and stock clutching go ahead. Not to mention the increased rotational mass and weight with 32" paddles. You'll find that 30" will do much better on all the above. But hey don't take my word for it, talk to Adam at Airdam Clutches, who knows more about these clutches probably than any other single person in the world. He's where I get my info from.

Ground clearance while appreciated isn't much of an issue in the sand. Ground clearance comes into play in rocky terrain, not soft sand. You'll have plenty of ground clearance with 30" paddles in sand.

I also wouldn't run a 7" rim on wide paddles tires (at least on the rear). I'd take it to a 8 or 9". Many people like 10 for the increased width, but you don't have to.
Okay - rotational mass argument does not work when most 32" paddle set ups weigh less than the stock 32" coyotes. Also just like the 32" dirt tires almost all the 32" paddle tires don't measure to 32". The exceptions being the Sandcraft or Warlocks which are at 32". But with those set ups they are super light and rotational mass is much less than a stock tire set up. Sandcraft 32" set up on a Packard wheel is around 33lbs on a DWT Beadlock it is around 36-38lbs. The stock Coyotes tires alone weigh more.

A 32" CST set up on beadlocks is in the 45lb range depending on wheel choice. CSTs are one of the lightest molded tire set up around.

Paddle profile is what you should be concerned with as too aggressive a profile will put more strain on the belt and rob hp.

Yes Adam knows clutching, but to say the stock clutching does not work with a 32" paddle tire is not 100% correct. Your right foot and driving style in the dunes will determine your belt life.

I agree a 8"-11" wide rear wheel is preferred, but the stock wheels will work with the CST set up. Yes they will be narrower, but they will work. The OP wanted to use his stock wheels for paddles and it can be done. Not ideal, but if that is all you can afford to do, it is what it is.

Ground clearance is still important in the sand. An extra 1" of clearance in the rear could be the difference of smacking the rear on a g-out.
 

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The Turbo S works perfectly fine with 32" paddle tires, in fact much better than 30" paddle tires. Why would you want to give up ground clearance with going to a smaller paddle tire? You don't don't need to clutch for 32" paddle tires and it is already clutched to run 32" tires.

To the OP - if you want to stick to the stock wheels for a paddle tires, then I suggest you look at the 32" CST sandblast set up. You can put them on the OEM 7" wheels no problem and they will be fine. Plus they don't cost a lot and are durable light weight set up for a molded tire.

The stock ITP Coyotes suck in the sand. My friend ran them last season in Glamis on his 4 seat turbo S. They don't hold lines going across the dunes very well and sink when you slow down. My other friend with a 4 seat turbo S ran 32" Sandcraft 10 paddle skats and a night and day difference over the stock tires.
Lol, I love a good debate. There's a huge difference from 32" paddles to 32" dirt tires. Stock clutching, while it will work, doesn't translate too well to 32" paddles. You will run far hotter belt temps, you'll struggle to put the power to the sand at many times. If you want to run 32" paddles and stock clutching go ahead. Not to mention the increased rotational mass and weight with 32" paddles. You'll find that 30" will do much better on all the above. But hey don't take my word for it, talk to Adam at Airdam Clutches, who knows more about these clutches probably than any other single person in the world. He's where I get my info from.

Ground clearance while appreciated isn't much of an issue in the sand. Ground clearance comes into play in rocky terrain, not soft sand. You'll have plenty of ground clearance with 30" paddles in sand.

I also wouldn't run a 7" rim on wide paddles tires (at least on the rear). I'd take it to a 8 or 9". Many people like 10 for the increased width, but you don't have to.
Okay - rotational mass argument does not work when most 32" paddle set ups weigh less than the stock 32" coyotes. Also just like the 32" dirt tires almost all the 32" paddle tires don't measure to 32". The exceptions being the Sandcraft or Warlocks which are at 32". But with those set ups they are super light and rotational mass is much less than a stock tire set up. Sandcraft 32" set up on a Packard wheel is around 33lbs on a DWT Beadlock it is around 36-38lbs. The stock Coyotes tires alone weigh more.

A 32" CST set up on beadlocks is in the 45lb range depending on wheel choice. CSTs are one of the lightest molded tire set up around.

Paddle profile is what you should be concerned with as too aggressive a profile will put more strain on the belt and rob hp.

Yes Adam knows clutching, but to say the stock clutching does not work with a 32" paddle tire is not 100% correct. Your right foot and driving style in the dunes will determine your belt life.

I agree a 8"-11" wide rear wheel is preferred, but the stock wheels will work with the CST set up. Yes they will be narrower, but they will work. The OP wanted to use his stock wheels for paddles and it can be done. Not ideal, but if that is all you can afford to do, it is what it is.

Ground clearance is still important in the sand. An extra 1" of clearance in the rear could be the difference of smacking the rear on a g-out.
You're comparing apples to oranges. I'm not comparing to stock coyote tires, could care less what they weigh. I'm saying a 30" paddle tire will have less rotational mass than a 32" paddle. The benefit here is to a 30" paddle. Most paddles these days are true to size. The only brand I know of that isn't is Sand Tires Unlimited.

I never said stock clutching won't work nor did Adam. It will hurt you though, you can't argue that because there is no argument. The stock clutch is optimized for 32" dirt tires not paddle tires which have considerable more drag, you know trying to scoop sand. It is far harder on every component of your rzr than a dirt tire in dirt. Therefore the 2 can't be compared. And if you have a clutch optimized for dirt doesn't mean you can just go do the same in sand.

To say the only thing that matters is your right foot, is ignorant. Clutching matters drastically as well as transmission gearing. But for this, I won't get into the rear diff.

Paddle profile sure matter good luck trying to get around the dunes with heavy 32" pro armor paddles with 14 paddles on them. Yet Polaris owns Pro Armor so this is what they push all day on their website. Polaris should refund the people who buy them. A 32" skat trak 9-10 paddle (which are a true 32) will outperform that pro armor easily. However, you know what will outperform that 32" skat trak on a stock clutch, a 30" skat trak. Again comparing apples to apples... paddles to paddles.

Can ground clearance come into play in the dunes, sure, not often though. Not enough to have it be an item of concern. There are plenty of people who use much smaller paddles. I think more than anything a rzr looks far better with 32" paddles, seriously looks awesome. Do your research and you'll quickly realize looks aren't worth the performance hit. Now if you really want to run 32" paddles effectively in a rzr, do a 10% gear reduction in your transmission. You'll lose a little top end but won't have clutching or high belts temps worry you anymore.
 

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Lol, I love a good debate. There's a huge difference from 32" paddles to 32" dirt tires. Stock clutching, while it will work, doesn't translate too well to 32" paddles. You will run far hotter belt temps, you'll struggle to put the power to the sand at many times. If you want to run 32" paddles and stock clutching go ahead. Not to mention the increased rotational mass and weight with 32" paddles. You'll find that 30" will do much better on all the above. But hey don't take my word for it, talk to Adam at Airdam Clutches, who knows more about these clutches probably than any other single person in the world. He's where I get my info from.

Ground clearance while appreciated isn't much of an issue in the sand. Ground clearance comes into play in rocky terrain, not soft sand. You'll have plenty of ground clearance with 30" paddles in sand.

I also wouldn't run a 7" rim on wide paddles tires (at least on the rear). I'd take it to a 8 or 9". Many people like 10 for the increased width, but you don't have to.
Okay - rotational mass argument does not work when most 32" paddle set ups weigh less than the stock 32" coyotes. Also just like the 32" dirt tires almost all the 32" paddle tires don't measure to 32". The exceptions being the Sandcraft or Warlocks which are at 32". But with those set ups they are super light and rotational mass is much less than a stock tire set up. Sandcraft 32" set up on a Packard wheel is around 33lbs on a DWT Beadlock it is around 36-38lbs. The stock Coyotes tires alone weigh more.

A 32" CST set up on beadlocks is in the 45lb range depending on wheel choice. CSTs are one of the lightest molded tire set up around.

Paddle profile is what you should be concerned with as too aggressive a profile will put more strain on the belt and rob hp.

Yes Adam knows clutching, but to say the stock clutching does not work with a 32" paddle tire is not 100% correct. Your right foot and driving style in the dunes will determine your belt life.

I agree a 8"-11" wide rear wheel is preferred, but the stock wheels will work with the CST set up. Yes they will be narrower, but they will work. The OP wanted to use his stock wheels for paddles and it can be done. Not ideal, but if that is all you can afford to do, it is what it is.

Ground clearance is still important in the sand. An extra 1" of clearance in the rear could be the difference of smacking the rear on a g-out.
You're comparing apples to oranges. I'm not comparing to stock coyote tires, could care less what they weigh. I'm saying a 30" paddle tire will have less rotational mass than a 32" paddle. The benefit here is to a 30" paddle. Most paddles these days are true to size. The only brand I know of that isn't is Sand Tires Unlimited.

I never said stock clutching won't work nor did Adam. It will hurt you though, you can't argue that because there is no argument. The stock clutch is optimized for 32" dirt tires not paddle tires which have considerable more drag, you know trying to scoop sand. It is far harder on every component of your rzr than a dirt tire in dirt. Therefore the 2 can't be compared. And if you have a clutch optimized for dirt doesn't mean you can just go do the same in sand.

To say the only thing that matters is your right foot, is ignorant. Clutching matters drastically as well as transmission gearing. But for this, I won't get into the rear diff.

Paddle profile sure matter good luck trying to get around the dunes with heavy 32" pro armor paddles with 14 paddles on them. Yet Polaris owns Pro Armor so this is what they push all day on their website. Polaris should refund the people who buy them. A 32" skat trak 9-10 paddle (which are a true 32) will outperform that pro armor easily. However, you know what will outperform that 32" skat trak on a stock clutch, a 30" skat trak. Again comparing apples to apples... paddles to paddles.

Can ground clearance come into play in the dunes, sure, not often though. Not enough to have it be an item of concern. There are plenty of people who use much smaller paddles. I think more than anything a rzr looks far better with 32" paddles, seriously looks awesome. Do your research and you'll quickly realize looks aren't worth the performance hit. Now if you really want to run 32" paddles effectively in a rzr, do a 10% gear reduction in your transmission. You'll lose a little top end but won't have clutching or high belts temps worry you anymore.
Just so we are clear I am only talking about a Turbo S, not the regular turbo XP.

So taking a set up that is the same size as the stock tires or pretty darn close and weighs less than a stock set up does not matter? Of course it matters as rotational mass is less. Less energy needed to get it rolling and keep it rolling. The Turbo S is clutched for a heavy ass dirt tire and now you are putting on a lighter set up.

Did you put 30" tires on for your dirt set up too for your Turbo S?

Even if you give up a little speed using a 32" tire the trade off is well worth it. The bigger tires handles the chop and rough better as it rolls over it. Also with the added ground clearance you are able to hit transitions at greater speed without worrying about stuffing the nose or smacking the rear.

Your argument is like when people gave up ground clearance to run 25 and 26" Skats on the XP1000 or Maverick versus running a 28" STU or 28" set up. Sure they spun up quicker and might of been a little quicker, but they sure could not make it through the dunes with out sand over the hood or dent the sand in the rear.

You have to pick you paddle tires carefully and with a good paddle profile. I would never run a Pro Armor, Sand Strippers or any of the other heavy molded tires with the crazy aggressive paddles. Of the molded tires I would run the CST or STUs. Otherwise the Sandcraft Skat set up is the choice for my driving style in the dunes.


If you don't think a driver has a lot to do with belts going boom you are crazy. Yes clutching helps, but it will not stop a person from blowing belts. Nor will a belt temp gauge keep a person from blowing a belt. I bet a driver that blows belts all the time will do the same whether on 32" or 30" tires and whether they have a tuned clutch or not. If you have a heavy right foot and don't know when to lay off it will kill belts quicker than anything. I have a friend that can blow belts in under 10 mintues in the dunes by driving like an ass. When he drives a little tamer no belt problems and he is still going just as fast. He has a clutch by Airdam too.
 
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